User ratio Canon DSLR to Nikon

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Ken Litton, Nov 19, 2006.

  1. Ken Litton

    Ken Litton Guest

    Does anyone have an informed view on what percentage of pro's use a
    Canon DSLR as opposed to a Nikon ... and why?

    I am thinking of things like overall image quality, feature set,
    reliability, cost-effectiveness, resale value, lens selection
    (including third party), availability of secondhand bodies and lenses,
    etc.

    Disregarding specific models, is one brand name inherently more
    suitable for certain types of photography, eg. landscape, portrait,
    etc?

    I know some of the Canon's are full frame, but let's put that
    advantage aside for this discussion since not everyone can afford
    them.

    Thank you,

    Ken Litton
     
    Ken Litton, Nov 19, 2006
    #1
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  2. The statistics below won't directly answer your question, but I thought
    was quite interesting. I got a book last year called "Love" that
    contains photographs compiled from (mostly professional) photographers
    all over the world. In the back it lists each photographer's credentials
    and their equipment. Most of the photography is traditional portraiture,
    some is street photography. The book was first published in '02 so a bit
    before the digital revolution really took hold - there isn't a single
    digital shot in the entire collection. I suspect that if the same thing
    was done today, Canon digitals would be the most common (I also suspect
    the photography would be far more boring and dull, with every photo
    having that "sameness" about them that comes from all being taken with
    the same sensor - much like a recent exhibition held here where the only
    standout photo was the only non-Canon-digital).

    Anyway, results from this book are as follows:
    Nikon 37
    Canon 15
    Leica 14
    Hasselblad 7
    Rollei 5
    Pentax 4
    Minolta 4
    Olympus 2
    Bronica 2
    Contax 2
    Unknown 2
    Noblex 1
    Zenit 1
    Ricoh 1
    Weathermatic 1
    Konica 1
    Linhof 1
     
    Graham Fountain, Nov 19, 2006
    #2
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  3. The PBase camera database shows the number of members who use each camera,
    and I'd guess that this must be a representative sample.

    http://www.pbase.com/cameras/canon&sort=users
    http://www.pbase.com/cameras/nikon&sort=users

    (Pity there is not a way to filter out all the p&s!)

    A quick glance seems to show that there are more Canon 1D series shooters
    than Nikon D2 series shooters. The results will be distorted as wealthy
    hobbyists also use these bodies and not just pros, and pros will also shoot
    with "non pro" bodies like the D5 & D200 or even entry level bodies, on the
    basis is that it's the glass that has much more effect on image quality than
    the body, but it looks like Canon has a bigger overall market share.
     
    Adrian Boliston, Nov 19, 2006
    #3
  4. About equal, according to: http://www.bythom.com/2006predictions.htm
     
    Charles Schuler, Nov 19, 2006
    #4
  5. I think it varies significantly by area. Below are my estimates from
    observation and interviews:
    Sport - 90%+ Canon
    Wedding/Portrait - Nikon higher than Canon (I'd say 60/40 between these
    two only, but then you must add in the Blads, etc)
    News - I would guess 50-50 here, but Canon on the rise due to sport
    Commercial/industrial - 60/40 Nikon/Canon

    Cheers,

    Wayne
     
    Wayne J. Cosshall, Nov 20, 2006
    #5
  6. Ken Litton

    Dave Cohen Guest

    I think you might have added considerations about what existing
    accessories one has. I would presume a pro moving from film to dslr
    would have a closet full of stuff with emphasis on lenses.
    My only direct experience with a pro was curiosity seeing a guy taking
    pics in a supermarket of all places, for some sort of store promotion.
    Since I couldn't identify what he was using I asked. It was a Hasselbad
    with a digital back. He said the outfit was worth about 30k, very
    impressive with hookup to a laptop for instant feedback. A little more
    than I would ever need (or know how to use).
    Dave Cohen
     
    Dave Cohen, Nov 20, 2006
    #6
  7. Ken Litton

    Bill Guest

    I don't think anyone has done a proper survey, not that it would mean
    much these days. I notice a lot of Canons at sporting events and I
    believe this is because a lot of sports shooters chose Canon IS lenses
    since at the time of introduction, Nikon did not have VR lenses
    available.

    But today that doesn't apply, and I've noticed more and more Nikons at
    sports events the last few years.
    None of that matters at all.

    Both Canon and Nikon have a good selection of quality bodies, lenses,
    and accessories that it generally doesn't matter which system you
    choose. Prices, performance, and quality are all very similar, and you
    will be happy with gear from either company.

    I've owned both Canon and Nikon, and I've used a fair number of lenses
    from both camps, and I can say there is no image quality difference
    between brands. Your decision will need to be made based on other
    factors.
    No, I don't believe so.

    One thing you will want to check before you buy is how the various
    cameras feel in your hands.

    I've found I prefer the ergonomic layout of the Nikon bodies,
    especially the hand grip, shutter release button, and front control
    dial. Others will prefer the feel of the Canon bodies...it's a
    personal choice and is one of the factors I referred to above.
     
    Bill, Nov 21, 2006
    #7
  8. Ken Litton

    MASL Guest

    Ken,

    You seem to want your cake & eat it too. Pros= get paid for shooting.
    So the cost of a camera for a pro is not as big an issue as it is fo
    the dilettante. Its not clear that you can put aside full frame, an
    more than you can put aside MF digital (or MF/ LF format film for tha
    matter). The smaller sensors DO effect the creative side of shootin
    and DO speed digital processing in camera. Your ability to control DO
    is much greater with a larger sensor, and that's why a lot of pro
    converted from Nikon systems to Canon when the 1Ds came out.

    -Mar
     
    MASL, Nov 21, 2006
    #8
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