using a dSLR camera as a video camera

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Brian, Jan 4, 2014.

  1. That time is likely now, with several tiny GoPro cameras in
    an array on a hat, simultaneously fired by Wi-Fi, with the
    images stitched together in software that provides for
    navigation within the resulting full-circle image. Using a
    single camera with fisheye on it, real-estate agents are
    now putting these "house tours" on their web sites, and for
    "SPECTACULARITY", it is hard to beat the sample here at this
    site! 8^) http://360gigapixels.com/tokyo-tower-panorama-photo/
    Click on the image center, and *carefully* move the mouse to
    change your viewpoint. FUN! 8^)
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Jan 6, 2014
    #21
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  2. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Thats a good demo thanks David. Its an improvement on Google maps.
    The only thing you can't do is look inside the windows but this would be a
    privacy problem if you could.

    Back in the early 1990's I saw a demo at a science convention where you
    could zoom in on a map like Google but then you could zoom in on a window
    on a house and keep zooming until you could see things inside the room. The
    information was contained on a very large disc, much larger then physical
    size than todays DVD discs. There was a collection of discs for different
    parts of a location which I think was a small town in England in the
    country. Someone had been busy mapping the place with photos.

    Some technologies seem to fail such as a camera that didn't need to focus.
    You could focus after the photo was taken. I can't remember what they
    called the technology. 3D is another technology that has not had much
    interest or major advancement, maybe people are waiting for the type of 3D
    where the viewer does not need to wear glasses.
     
    Brian, Jan 6, 2014
    #22
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  3. Such doesn't seem to bother the US NSA much... (I suspect that
    soon the air will be full of little snooping drones, unless
    something is done about that sooner...;-(
    "Lytro" - and it did seem kinda useless, given the low quality
    of the images (and very deep DOF inherent with the small-sensored
    amateur cameras, making "refocusing" unnecessary). It was easy to
    predict the failure of 3D TV, but for stills, it has been possible
    to shoot 3D that does not require glasses to view (although it
    does require some viewing skills...;-). I have quite a few of these
    on my website, with instructionson how to view them. These were
    mostly shot with a single video camera as stills, taking first one
    frame, then moving the hand-held camera sideways a bit, and shooting
    a similarly framed second photo. Crude, but it works!;-) They are at:
    http://www.donferrario.com/ruether/changing.html To add to what is
    written there, while viewing, make sure to adjust your head sideways-
    tilt so that the bottoms of the two images coincide, otherwise it
    will be difficult to resolve the two into the one 3D image. I once
    made a 3D video that could be viewed the same way on a TV, using two
    identical camcorders mounted side-by-side. It worked, but.....;-)

    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Jan 6, 2014
    #23
  4. That's a picture!

    Besides the spectacular nature of the photo, a couple of things struck
    me.

    1. As buildings were panned in from the side, they showed significant
    fisheye-lens barrel distortion which diminished until the buildings
    were straight in the center, and then the distortion increased in the
    opposite direction as the buildings were panned out to the other side.
    Some interesting processing was going on there !

    2. Tokyo is *not* a small city...
     
    Gene E. Bloch, Jan 6, 2014
    #24
  5. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Lets like you also have a keen interest in 3D photography David.
    I must check out your web site.
    Sony came up with the idea of taking stereo photos with a single lens
    camera. The camera focuses on the closest object near the centre of its
    view then it focus on a distance object. This tells the camera what object
    is in front and what object is the background. I'm not certain about the
    rest but it must move the objects slightly for each photo (left and right
    eye). I don't know what the results are like as I don't have stereo on my
    TV.
     
    Brian, Jan 7, 2014
    #25
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