Using an LED torch as fill light

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by David L, Nov 10, 2004.

  1. David L

    David L Guest

    Hi, i read about LED torches nowadays could be so strong that some will
    harm the eyes. So started to dream about using one of them as a
    subsitute for fill flash. (because it would be so much cheaper than
    buying a second flash) That is i would just put the flash on the floor
    (or even wear it on my head). Haven't yet found discussion on the net
    about it though. Is the idea too crazy?

    So far found this link only but it's about a macro flash.
    http://www.popphoto.com/article.asp?section_id=3&article_id=850
     
    David L, Nov 10, 2004
    #1
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  2. David L

    Adam F Guest

    hmm led head torch would seem like a good idea to me...light is nice and
    white and the multi-led ones tend to put out a nice broad beam

    buy a $30 one and have a go :)

    //adam f
     
    Adam F, Nov 10, 2004
    #2
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  3. David L

    Scott Coutts Guest

    I think you'll find that they will be way too dim compared to a flash.

    Scott.
     
    Scott Coutts, Nov 10, 2004
    #3
  4. David L

    Adam F Guest

    hmm
    maybe 5W luxeon then...but not that much cheaper than a sigma flash
    o well


    //adam f
     
    Adam F, Nov 10, 2004
    #4
  5. David L

    David L Guest

    Thanks Scott, Adam,
    may i ask which sigma flash you were referring to (i'll check it out).
    Regards.
     
    David L, Nov 10, 2004
    #5
  6. David L

    Phil Cole Guest

    Yep, far too dim, and too uneven. You wouldn't be able to mix them with
    flash eiter, as most white leds are too blue. As an excercise, try
    getting a desk lamp, shine it on your subject and see what your camera
    meters - you'll find that you need a *LOT* of lights to get the
    equivalent light of a flash.

    Cheers,
    Phil
     
    Phil Cole, Nov 10, 2004
    #6
  7. David L

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    Nice and white? most 'white' LED spectra I've seen have quite a bit of
    structure.

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Nov 10, 2004
    #7
  8. David L

    David L Guest

    Thanks Phil i'll try it out with a smaller torch first.
     
    David L, Nov 10, 2004
    #8
  9. David L

    Danny Rohr Guest

    ..au...
    More like halogen torches are yellow.

    Danny.
     
    Danny Rohr, Nov 10, 2004
    #9
  10. David L

    Phil Cole Guest

    I don't quite get your point...

    Phil
     
    Phil Cole, Nov 10, 2004
    #10
  11. David L

    Russ Guest

    I think you'd find that the output still isn't close to a flash, and also
    the output spectrum is probably all over the shop - it'd be very hard to
    correct to match the flash. You might be better off using 2 torches and no
    flah, one for key and one for fill.
     
    Russ, Nov 10, 2004
    #11
  12. David L

    David L Guest

    same here...
     
    David L, Nov 10, 2004
    #12
  13. David L

    David L Guest

    Thanks Russ. Okay it's sounding more and more like a bad idea..
     
    David L, Nov 10, 2004
    #13
  14. David L

    Bruce Graham Guest

    I agree that the spectrum of the white LED's I have played with is odd.
    Basically, these are blue emitting devices with "white" fluorescent
    material in the beam, optimised for efficiency not spectral purity. In
    addition the ones I have seen have a noticeable blue colour in the
    central hot spot with significantly different colours moving out from the
    centre. My info is a bit old though. The new high power ones might be a
    bit better.

    There is plenty of info on the web eg. a hobbyist site is
    http://www.e-f-w.com/community/index.php
     
    Bruce Graham, Nov 10, 2004
    #14
  15. David L

    Adam F Guest

    the cheapest one which works with your camera
    i got a minolta mount DL500 for $20 from local trader who thought it was
    stuffed
    i had read online that it usually just needs a small adjustment to the zoom
    motor, and that turned out to be it

    even in good condition shouldn't be more than $100

    hth

    //adam f
     
    Adam F, Nov 11, 2004
    #15
  16. David L

    Adam F Guest



    correction: EF-500

    sorry

    //adam f
     
    Adam F, Nov 11, 2004
    #16
  17. David L

    Scott Coutts Guest

    Colour balance is not too much of a worry if you're using digital :)

    Scott.
     
    Scott Coutts, Nov 11, 2004
    #17
  18. David L

    Scott Coutts Guest

    What's wrong with 'nice and white'? White light is what you want, as
    compared to too much red or too much blue, like many lights are.

    Scott.
     
    Scott Coutts, Nov 11, 2004
    #18
  19. David L

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    Non-continuous lighting will still screw you.

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Nov 11, 2004
    #19
  20. David L

    Bruce Murphy Guest

    Nothing. See those quotes around white up there?
    You can compensate for those far better than you can compensate for a
    light source with sharps spikes in its spectra.

    B>
     
    Bruce Murphy, Nov 11, 2004
    #20
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