Using enlarger to make positive prints from negative pinhole camera images

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by James Keller, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. James  Keller

    James Keller Guest

    If I have negative black and white images on full-size photo paper
    (the paper was used in a pinhole camera, so processing produces a
    negative image), how can I use the enlarger to make a copy of the
    print that will be a positive?

    Any help would be appreciated.
     
    James Keller, Feb 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. I did this when I was young: it worked, it took
    a long time and results weren't anywhere near as
    good as they are with pinhole negatives.

    Put the paper where the negative would go, emulsion
    side towards the lens.

    I'd leave the enlarger lens wide open - it being
    a pinhole negative there isn't that much sharpness
    to worry about.

    Variable contrast paper with no filter is probably the
    fastest paper around.

    Stray light coming out of the enlarger will have more
    effect than normal. If light comes out around the lamp
    house drape some cloth to block it. Obviously, don't
    block ventilation holes but do something with them if
    they leak light. This may have been the reason for the
    low contrast results I obtained when I did it.
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Feb 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. James  Keller

    tintmobile Guest




    First place a sheet of photo paper in your easel with emulsion side
    facing up. Now place your negative on top of the first sheet with
    emulsion side facing down. Open up your enlarger lens to f8 then turn
    it on for about five seconds (for starters) then process normally.
     
    tintmobile, Feb 6, 2007
    #3
  4. James  Keller

    darkroommike Guest

    I can think of one option that hasn't been mentioned yet.
    Rephotograph the negative image onto another piece of paper.
    Using you enlarger as a copy camera or make a pinhole copy
    camera!

    darkroommike
     
    darkroommike, Feb 6, 2007
    #4
  5. James  Keller

    footermatt Guest

    James Keller has the right idea. You're merely using a paper negative
    to make a contact print, a tried and true historical technique.
    You'll get better image quality if you use a contact print frame or a
    piece of glass in place of the easal. Just proceed as JK states,
    unexposed paper emulsion side up on enlarger base, paper negative
    emulsion side down, glass on top to keep the "negative" in close
    contact with the paper and then make a 5 second test strip. Adjusting
    contrast with VC paper might be more difficult than usual but it
    should work--at least a bit. Lowering contrast using the water bath
    technique and increasing it with spiked developer will work if you're
    so inclined. Of course you don't need an enlarger for this sort of
    stuff, any number of light sources that aren't diffuse will work quite
    well for this type of contact print making. The sun is an excellent
    light source that works wonders using this technique with 'printing
    out' papers.

    Matt
     
    footermatt, Feb 8, 2007
    #5
  6. spake thus regarding today's topic, contact printing:
    I use a small (~7 watt) night-light bulb suspended about 4 feet over the
    contact frame.


    --
    Don't talk to me, those of you who must need to be slammed in the
    forehead with a maul before you'll GET IT that Wikipedia is a
    time-wasting, totality of CRAP...don't talk to me, don't keep bleating
    like naifs, that we should somehow waste MORE of our lives writing a
    variorum text that would be put up on that site.

    It is a WASTE OF TIME.

    - Harlan Ellison, writing on the "talk page" of his Wikipedia article
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Harlan_Ellison)
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 8, 2007
    #6
  7. spake thus:
    You forgot one thing: a sheet of glass on top will keep the negative in
    contact with the paper. (That's why most folks opt to use some kind of
    contact frame. A simple homemade one will work just fine.)

    Also, you don't need an enlarger: a small light bulb will do the trick.


    --
    Don't talk to me, those of you who must need to be slammed in the
    forehead with a maul before you'll GET IT that Wikipedia is a
    time-wasting, totality of CRAP...don't talk to me, don't keep bleating
    like naifs, that we should somehow waste MORE of our lives writing a
    variorum text that would be put up on that site.

    It is a WASTE OF TIME.

    - Harlan Ellison, writing on the "talk page" of his Wikipedia article
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Harlan_Ellison)
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 12, 2007
    #7
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