VCD's - best quality?

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Tom, Aug 24, 2003.

  1. Tom

    Tom Guest

    Hello folks,

    I've just made a couple of test SVCD's but am not pleased with the quality.
    What's the best quality you can get for a VCD?

    I'm using Adobe Prem 6.5 with the MPEG encoder and NERO to burn the SVCD's.

    On another note, i noticed a thing bright green line across the bottom of
    some of my exported footage, other than cropping and re-exporting is there a
    way this can be avoided?

    Tom.
     
    Tom, Aug 24, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Tom

    20/20 Guest

    Hi,

    I have prem 6, so I am not familiar with your version, however, I have had
    the same problems with S/VCD and DVD, until now that is.

    I do all of my mpeg encoding with a separate piece of software, TMPGEnc from
    Pegasys.com I think.
    This piece of software started life as a freebee, but now sells for about
    $45 or so. It is very versatile and requires some knowledge of the mpeg
    structure to get the best out of it. I have managed to squeeze 90 minutes
    onto DVD with no appreciable quality loss, and at 60 minutes video no
    visible loss at all. My recent attempts at producing VCD & SVCD were very
    encouraging, but as my main application is for DVD then this was really an
    academic exercise for me.

    Adobe Prem 6 is very good at editing, but has shortcomings with mpeg
    encoding. Version 6.5 may be different, I don't know.

    TMPGEnc is a cracking little piece of software at a good price

    Good Points:

    Excellent mpeg quality, flexibility, price, it does the job.

    Bad Points:

    To get the best out of TMPGEnc you need to know what you are doing and the
    help files just tell you what each function is, not what is does or how and
    when to apply it. There are some good web sites that will give a helping
    hand though.

    It's slow, very slow. 15 hours to encode 120 minutes high quality mpeg
    destined for DVD, life does get better though when the video length comes
    down to 60 minutes or less, coding time drops rapidly to about an hour or so
    depending how you have set things up.

    You still need authoring software for the final burn, you have Nero and that
    should be fine for VCD's etc.

    Even with the bad points, it floats my boat.

    John D.
     
    20/20, Aug 25, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Tom

    20/20 Guest

    Hi,

    I have prem 6, so I am not familiar with your version, however, I have had
    the same problems with S/VCD and DVD, until now that is.

    I do all of my mpeg encoding with a separate piece of software, TMPGEnc from
    Pegasys.com I think.
    This piece of software started life as a freebee, but now sells for about
    $45 or so. It is very versatile and requires some knowledge of the mpeg
    structure to get the best out of it. I have managed to squeeze 90 minutes
    onto DVD with no appreciable quality loss, and at 60 minutes video no
    visible loss at all. My recent attempts at producing VCD & SVCD were very
    encouraging, but as my main application is for DVD then this was really an
    academic exercise for me.

    Adobe Prem 6 is very good at editing, but has shortcomings with mpeg
    encoding. Version 6.5 may be different, I don't know.

    TMPGEnc is a cracking little piece of software at a good price

    Good Points:

    Excellent mpeg quality, flexibility, price, it does the job.

    Bad Points:

    To get the best out of TMPGEnc you need to know what you are doing and the
    help files just tell you what each function is, not what is does or how and
    when to apply it. There are some good web sites that will give a helping
    hand though.

    It's slow, very slow. 15 hours to encode 120 minutes high quality mpeg
    destined for DVD, life does get better though when the video length comes
    down to 60 minutes or less, coding time drops rapidly to about an hour or so
    depending how you have set things up.

    You still need authoring software for the final burn, you have Nero and that
    should be fine for VCD's etc.

    Even with the bad points, it floats my boat.

    John D.
     
    20/20, Aug 25, 2003
    #3
  4. Tom

    Tom Guest

    20/20 wrote:
    :: Hi,
    ::
    :: I have prem 6, so I am not familiar with your version, however, I
    :: have had the same problems with S/VCD and DVD, until now that is.
    ::
    :: I do all of my mpeg encoding with a separate piece of software,
    :: TMPGEnc from Pegasys.com I think.
    :: This piece of software started life as a freebee, but now sells for
    :: about $45 or so. It is very versatile and requires some knowledge of
    :: the mpeg structure to get the best out of it. I have managed to
    :: squeeze 90 minutes onto DVD with no appreciable quality loss, and at
    :: 60 minutes video no visible loss at all. My recent attempts at
    :: producing VCD & SVCD were very encouraging, but as my main
    :: application is for DVD then this was really an academic exercise for
    :: me.
    ::
    :: Adobe Prem 6 is very good at editing, but has shortcomings with mpeg
    :: encoding. Version 6.5 may be different, I don't know.
    ::
    :: TMPGEnc is a cracking little piece of software at a good price
    ::
    :: Good Points:
    ::
    :: Excellent mpeg quality, flexibility, price, it does the job.
    ::
    :: Bad Points:
    ::
    :: To get the best out of TMPGEnc you need to know what you are doing
    :: and the help files just tell you what each function is, not what is
    :: does or how and when to apply it. There are some good web sites that
    :: will give a helping hand though.
    ::
    :: It's slow, very slow. 15 hours to encode 120 minutes high quality
    :: mpeg destined for DVD, life does get better though when the video
    :: length comes down to 60 minutes or less, coding time drops rapidly
    :: to about an hour or so depending how you have set things up.
    ::
    :: You still need authoring software for the final burn, you have Nero
    :: and that should be fine for VCD's etc.
    ::
    :: Even with the bad points, it floats my boat.
    ::
    :: John D.


    So in order to use this software do you have to render your entire project
    as an AVI, then MPEG it in TMPGenc?
     
    Tom, Aug 26, 2003
    #4
  5. Tom

    Samuel Paik Guest

    I believe Premiere 6.5 includes a plug-in version of the MainConcept
    MPEG Encoder. The full version is quite good, and an upgrade to
    the full version is available at low cost. Additionally, there is
    an update to the 6.5 plugin available from MainConcept.

    <http://www.mainconcept.com/>

    Yes.

    But I'd first: get the MainConcept update. I don't know what kind of
    control you have from the Premiere plugin, but you may want to try
    different settings if you can.

    Sam
     
    Samuel Paik, Aug 27, 2003
    #5
  6. Tom

    20/20 Guest

    So in order to use this software do you have to render your entire project

    Yes
     
    20/20, Aug 28, 2003
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.