Vegas Pro 12 verses Premiere Pro CS6

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Brian, Dec 23, 2012.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I like to explore updated programs so recently I have been comparing
    Premiere to Vegas.

    One weakness that I was surprised to find in Premiere is that it has
    trouble in reading some of the VOB files. I had a 8mm film converted to DVD
    so that it would play in a DVD player and Premiere failed to read the VOB
    file but Vegas had no problems in reading it. So there is the extra step of
    converting the file to another format before Premiere will read it.

    Titles are easier to create in Vegas than in Premiere. But Premiere allows
    you to create a scrolling title that will stop when the last line of text
    is in the middle of the screen and it has a decelerated stop.

    Missing in Premiere are the choices of curves for fades etc but moving the
    position of a transition is easier in premiere.
    Premiere also has a more wider choice of video effects such as converting a
    video clip into an artist drawing. In Vegas you have to buy these as extra
    add ons.

    I noticed that Premiere keeps to its old format such as using the razor
    blade icon to cut a video that's on the timeline, which is useful for those
    that are use to physically cutting a strip of film as in the old days
    before video; but there is that extra step of having to select and move the
    razor icon to where you want to cut the video where Vegas has a shortcut
    key to cut the video at the position of the timeline cursor.
    I did like that I was able to click on the a video on the timeline without
    the timeline pointer moving where in Vegas the timeline pointer moved to
    where you selected the video.

    I still have a lot more to explore but Its interesting that many of the
    editing features stay the same such as creating sub clips and locking the
    timeline. Having experience with Vegas made it easier to learn how to use
    Premiere.
    I have no desire to change to Premiere as I still prefer to use Vegas but I
    like exploring programs.
     
    Brian, Dec 23, 2012
    #1
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  2. Brian

    ushere Guest

    i have used all the major nle's over a number of years and...

    a. they all do the same job - cut and join video and audio. each has it's
    own methodology, which with constant use becomes second nature.

    b. they all do titling and fx - all of them come with built in 'tacky/basic'
    effects and transitions, and all of them can be supplemented with PAID FOR
    3rd party plug ins.

    c. they are all simply TOOLS, they do not create great videos in themselves,
    YOU do.

    d. usually the editor using X nle will tell you that all the other nle's are
    crap.

    e. he's probably right ;-)

    have a great humbug!



    "Brian" wrote in message

    I like to explore updated programs so recently I have been comparing
    Premiere to Vegas.

    One weakness that I was surprised to find in Premiere is that it has
    trouble in reading some of the VOB files. I had a 8mm film converted to DVD
    so that it would play in a DVD player and Premiere failed to read the VOB
    file but Vegas had no problems in reading it. So there is the extra step of
    converting the file to another format before Premiere will read it.

    Titles are easier to create in Vegas than in Premiere. But Premiere allows
    you to create a scrolling title that will stop when the last line of text
    is in the middle of the screen and it has a decelerated stop.

    Missing in Premiere are the choices of curves for fades etc but moving the
    position of a transition is easier in premiere.
    Premiere also has a more wider choice of video effects such as converting a
    video clip into an artist drawing. In Vegas you have to buy these as extra
    add ons.

    I noticed that Premiere keeps to its old format such as using the razor
    blade icon to cut a video that's on the timeline, which is useful for those
    that are use to physically cutting a strip of film as in the old days
    before video; but there is that extra step of having to select and move the
    razor icon to where you want to cut the video where Vegas has a shortcut
    key to cut the video at the position of the timeline cursor.
    I did like that I was able to click on the a video on the timeline without
    the timeline pointer moving where in Vegas the timeline pointer moved to
    where you selected the video.

    I still have a lot more to explore but Its interesting that many of the
    editing features stay the same such as creating sub clips and locking the
    timeline. Having experience with Vegas made it easier to learn how to use
    Premiere.
    I have no desire to change to Premiere as I still prefer to use Vegas but I
    like exploring programs.
     
    ushere, Dec 23, 2012
    #2
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  3. I am trying to learn Vegas, but am more familiar with Premiere and probably
    biased. To me, Premiere is like greased lightning to edit in. For example,
    cut and paste attributes. I did a Nutcracker dance video in which I had to
    show several pages of the program on screen. I did this by zooming in to the
    top of the page, then slowly moving down the page until I came to a stop at
    the bottom, then fade out and do the next page. I found that I could
    automate all of these graphics moves by copying the clip with all of these
    motion effects on it, then paste attributes on the next one and all of those
    moves will be transferred. Another great trick I just learned on Premiere is
    that you can adjust sound levels to any boost or cut you want right on the
    timeline by right clicking on the clip, select audio gain, and set the gain
    up or down at will. You can also see the waveform right there on the
    timeline, to make sure you're not clipping. This saved my butt on this last
    one.

    Possibly another superiority of Premiere is in pulling multiple clips at
    once. Premiere has a multi arrow that can pull the front clip and every clip
    behind it all at once. Vegas has to have you corrale them all in a loop
    select before it will pull multiple clips at once. Right?

    Lately, I have had more trouble with making DVDs than in editing. The damn
    Encore program will not do what I want, some sort of glitches that I have
    not experienced before. Might have to try the DVD Architect and see if it is
    as capable as Encore when working right.

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Dec 23, 2012
    #3
  4. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Some of the things you said such as altering the sound can also be done in
    Vegas.
    Both programs seem to be the cream of the crop and have set a standard in
    video editing.
    I like the logic of having all the keys on the keyboard grouped together;
    the I, O keys at the top, the J,K,L keys in the middle and the comma and
    full stop keys at the bottom. These are the main keys you use so your hand
    can stay in the same position on the keyboard.
    Thanks to YouTube there are many short tutorials to learn from.
    One thing I want to try is to render the same video clip in both video
    editors to find out which is the fastest at rendering.

    The crossfades are easier to see on the timeline in Vegas than what they
    are in Premiere but you should be able to zoom in on the timeline to see
    the parts that contain fades and video effects better; however i'm still
    finding a way of doing this in Premiere.
     
    Brian, Dec 23, 2012
    #4
  5. You just press + or - on the keyboard to zoom in or out. And yes, the
    crossfades are just as easy to see in Premiere, and maybe even easier to
    make. All you do is position the cursor at the beginning or end of a clip,
    and press Control-D and you've got a fade in or out or a crossfade. If you
    are on an audio clip, press Control-Shift-D and you've got an audio fade in
    or out. After that, you can stretch the fades by just grabbing with the
    arrow and pulling.

    Gary
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Dec 23, 2012
    #5
  6. One thing I am trying to figure out - and I don't care which edit program
    can do this - maybe Ruether can help us out on this - my video is shot in
    AVCHD, right? So if I make just simple edits and don't need to do anything
    to the video, I should be able to render a finished file without any
    rendering for the parts that were left alone. I thought DR said that Vegas
    can do this, but under what conditions etc I forget.

    I have had more luck outputting to MPEG2 Blu-ray in Premiere, thinking that
    it will then not need to be rendered in the Encore DVD program because the
    file is already in Blu-ray format. But it always does re-render it, and I
    can't find a setting that tells it not to render. Maybe it is because the
    bitrates are different between my file and Encore's Automatic transcoding
    function. Still, if it fits on the disc and there is no need to mess with
    it, there should be a way to tell it do not transcode.

    Oh - I just remembered - when I take it out to MPEG2 Blu-ray in Premiere, it
    gives me separate audio and video files. That may be another reaon it wants
    to transcode it.

    Gary Eickmeier
     
    Gary Eickmeier, Dec 24, 2012
    #6
  7. Brian

    Brian Guest

    It's called smart rendering.

    Take a look at this forum for more information.

    http://openshotusers.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=789
     
    Brian, Dec 24, 2012
    #7
  8. Gary Eickmeier, Dec 24, 2012
    #8
  9. Brian

    mkujbida Guest


    Yes but only with certain formats and the output format must match the timeline format exactly or this won't work.

    Mike
     
    mkujbida, Dec 25, 2012
    #9
  10. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Watch out Vegas as Premiere seems to be catching up on features. I came
    across a few new features added to Premiere CS6 that were standard with
    version 10 of Vegas.
    In version 10 of vegas the stabilizer feature had many options but in
    version 11 they removed many of the options and made it more simple.
    Premiere seems to have added some useful options to their stabilizer
    option.
    The colour picker for the green screen effect used in Premiere is missing
    in Vegas (unless they have added it to version 12).

    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Dec 26, 2012
    #10
  11. Brian

    ushere Guest

    The colour picker for the green screen effect used in Premiere is missing
    in Vegas (unless they have added it to version 12).

    ? always been there in every version i've had - what was/is screwed is
    dragging out for range - it works but there's no dotted rectangle to show
    you the area you've dragged.
     
    ushere, Dec 27, 2012
    #11
  12. Brian

    Brian Guest

    It's starting to come back to mw now...there was something and I thought it
    was the color picker. I wonder if Premiere allows the user to drag out a
    range.
     
    Brian, Dec 28, 2012
    #12
  13. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Does any Adobe Premiere Pro user know of a short cut key where you can cut
    the video on the time line at the place where the time line cursor is
    located without having to move the razor icon tool to the timeline?
     
    Brian, Jan 3, 2013
    #13
  14. I seem to recall that that is one of the differences
    between Premiere and Vegas: Vegas can be operated mainly
    with key-strokes. Unfortunately, my memory is too poor
    to remember most of them, including ones I could make up
    for myself - so I mostly still go with menus. I do find
    the S, G, U, Alt+<-, Alt+->, Shift+B, Ctrl+C, Ctrl+V, etc.
    key commands useful, though...
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Jan 3, 2013
    #14
  15. Brian

    Fishface Guest

    I'm not actually an Adobe Premiere Pro user (sorry!), I'm just a guy from
    a trailer park with a search engine. A Google search for the words:

    adobe premiere keyboard shortcuts

    ....found 242,000 matches in 0.17 seconds, most of which don't actually
    contain those words. I'm not quite sure what their logic is. Anyway, this
    page lists a bunch of keyboard shortcuts for CS6:

    http://helpx.adobe.com/content/help/en/premiere-pro/using/default-keyboard-shortcuts.html

    If you are in the "Timeline Panel," the <ctrl> + k , or Apple <cmd> + k
    result in "Cut at current-time indicator." It must be Norwegian, Swedish,
    Greek, Swahili, Azerbaijani, or Haitian Creole.

    It appears that you can customize your keyboard shortcuts, the details
    are on that same page.
     
    Fishface, Jan 3, 2013
    #15
  16. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Thanks Fishface.

    So it looks like Control K is the short cut for cutting videos on the time
    line.
    I like being able to click on the video thats on the timeline to select it
    without the timeline cursor changing its position.

    One problem with Google is that you sometimes need to go thru a lot of
    found web sites before finding what you need, but to get a good site from
    the search its sometimes worth the time.
     
    Brian, Jan 4, 2013
    #16
  17. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I can't remember what those short cuts do but must find out. I use J, K, L
    keys a lot.
     
    Brian, Jan 4, 2013
    #17
  18. Um, wrong - see "Fishface's" post...;-)
    "S" = "Split video at cursor location"
    "G" = "Combine clips (video and/or audio) that have been selected"
    "U" = "Detach clips (video and/or audio) that have been selected"
    "Alt+<-" (hold "Alt" key while holding left arrow key) =
    "Play timeline backward from cursor position slowly"
    "Alt+<-" (hold "Alt" key while clicking on left arrow key) =
    "Play timeline backward from cursor position frame-by-frame"
    "Alt+->" (hold "Alt" key while holding right arrow key) =
    "Play timeline forward from cursor position slowly"
    "Alt+->" (hold "Alt" key while clicking on right arrow key) =
    "Play timeline forward from cursor position frame-by-frame"
    [These last four make placing the "Split" position for the cursor
    precise.]
    "Shift+B" (used after defining the "loop region" for rendering
    with the "yellow-triangles-with-grey-bar" extended over the
    desired area of the timeline) = "Render to RAM the selected
    part of timeline" (Predetermine the amount of RAM assigned to
    this here: "Options" > "Preferences" > "Video" > "Dynamic RAM
    Preview max")
    [If more than a possible length is selected for the available RAM,
    the grey bar will automatically shorten at the end of the render
    to the maximum possible.]
    "Ctrl+C/Ctrl+V" = "Copy-what-is-selected/Paste-where-selected"
    "Etc." = "More things can be done with key strokes, but I can't
    remember what just now..." 8^)
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Jan 4, 2013
    #18
  19. Brian

    ushere Guest

    all helps have keyboard shortcut menus in every nle i've ever come
    across.....
     
    ushere, Jan 5, 2013
    #19
  20. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Very useful thanks David.
    I should use short cuts more often.
     
    Brian, Jan 5, 2013
    #20
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