Vignetting with filter

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by .joj, Jul 19, 2003.

  1. .joj

    .joj Guest

    I took some shots with a 135mm lens and a 52mm filter on a 52mm mount and I
    got vignetting at aperture 11. How is this possible?

    Can the color of the filter result in a vignetting effect on the blue sky? I
    use a Hoya HMC 82A filter.


    ..joj
     
    .joj, Jul 19, 2003
    #1
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  2. .joj

    John Miller Guest

    Perhaps you were using a 135mm lens on an 8x10 view camera.

    With a single filter (not stacked) and no lens hood on a 135mm optic on a
    35mm camera, there should be no vingetting, except for that which is
    produced by the lens itself.
    What was the brand of the lens?

    --
    John Miller

    mixed emotions:
    Watching your mother-in-law back off a cliff...
    in your brand new Mercedes.
     
    John Miller, Jul 19, 2003
    #2
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  3. .joj

    .joj Guest



    What is an 8x10 view camera?



    Yashica ML 135mm/2.8. But I had vignetting with with both my 28mm and 35mm.



    ..joj
     
    .joj, Jul 19, 2003
    #3
  4. .joj

    .joj Guest

    Could it come from the photo lab?


    ..joj
     
    .joj, Jul 19, 2003
    #4
  5. .joj

    John Miller Guest

    With negative film, it's possible, depending upon the sort of equipment they
    were using. Take a look at your negatives and see if you can detect the
    vignetting on them, and if not, there's your answer.

    With slides, no, the lab is blameless.
    --
    John Miller

    "Life and death are seldom logical."
    "But attaining a desired goal always is."
    -McCoy and Spock, "The Galileo Seven", stardate 2821.7
     
    John Miller, Jul 19, 2003
    #5
  6. .joj

    Alan Browne Guest

    ....was it stacked by any chance on top of a clear filter (UV or Skylight)?
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 20, 2003
    #6
  7. .joj

    auspics Guest

    This can be a function of the camera too.
    Sometimes with my Fuji GWSIII (6x9 cm negative) I do a sunset and when I
    lower the contrast to bring out the colours of the sky... See that effect
    even when I stop down to f22. Personally I don't mind it but I wouldn't call
    it true vignetting.
    JT
     
    auspics, Jul 20, 2003
    #7
  8. .joj

    Alan Browne Guest

    "True vignetting"?

    vignetting is anything, intentional or otherwise, that makes a vigentte
    on the final image.
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 20, 2003
    #8
  9. .joj

    Alan Browne Guest

    Possible, very unlikely. Inspect your negatives/slides first.
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 20, 2003
    #9
  10. .joj

    .joj Guest

    No, and I have a lenshood that is much longer anyway.


    ..joj
     
    .joj, Jul 20, 2003
    #10
  11. .joj

    auspics Guest

    I'm glad to se you are open minded, Alan.
    True Vignetting is from interference which results in a highly noticable
    area at the corners of a film being under exposed. The effect I speak of can
    be seen in the sky of the dusk sky of the pic here:
    http://www.auspics.org/mf-sale.html
    JT
     
    auspics, Jul 21, 2003
    #11
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