Wedding pictures and aspect ratio

Discussion in 'Photography' started by DanR, Jul 22, 2007.

  1. DanR

    DanR Guest

    I'm wondering why a pro photographer would do this?
    My daughters wedding pictures were delivered to her on CD. I notice that all
    of them have a 600x480 or 480x600 aspect ratio. They are much larger but
    using 480 as a common denominator and comparing these pictures to other
    camera pictures I see that my Canon XTi shoots 720x480 and my older Olympus
    shoots 640x480. The wedding pics are all of different pixel dimensions but
    the aspect remains very close to 480x600. For example one picture is
    1728x2160 and another is 2258x2823. I'm guessing that all of the pics were
    cropped some and thus the different actual pixel sizes. But why are they all
    600x480 and 480x600 aspect? Does this size make for better printing to
    standard paper size?
    Per the exif data the camera is Canon EOS 20D.
     
    DanR, Jul 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. DanR

    Stan Beck Guest

    How does that ratio relate to standard frame sizes?

    It is also a good size for the computer screen, but won't allow you to go
    buy prints of his photos from somebody else.

    --
    The smaller the fine print, the less you will like what it says.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Jul 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. DanR

    DanR Guest

    As far as I know the deal was sort of a buy-out. No prints were delivered.
    Only the CD to do with whatever. You mention standard frame size. So I
    assume you mean that she could have prints made that will fit nicely in off
    the shelf frames without trimming the image.
     
    DanR, Jul 22, 2007
    #3
  4. There is no standard frame aspect ratio because frames are designed to
    fit standard paper sizes 6"x4", 5"x7", 10"x8", 10"x14" etc.

    As these all have different aspect ratios there is no way you can choose
    an aspect ratio that best suits a frame size unless you know how big it
    is going to be enlarged to.

    Typical display wedding prints would be 10"x8" which is a 5:4 aspect
    ratio, the same ratio as your images, which might explain why they chose
    that ratio.

    Remember that unless one shoots 35mm and prints on 6"x4" you're pretty
    much never going to fill a standard paper size without some image cropping.
     
    Richard Polhill, Jul 22, 2007
    #4
  5. DanR

    Stan Beck Guest

    Yes, a 480 p x 600 p ratio is the same ratio as 4" x 5" or 8" x 10 inches -
    standard image size. 4 x 6 is 35mm aspect ratio, but frame sizes are
    generally 4x5, 5x7, 8x10, etc.

    --
    The smaller the fine print, the less you will like what it says.

    Stan Beck > From New Orleans to Brandon MS
    To reply, remove 101 from address.
    ***
     
    Stan Beck, Jul 22, 2007
    #5
  6. DanR

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I'm wondering why a pro photographer would do this?
    : My daughters wedding pictures were delivered to her on CD. I notice that all
    : of them have a 600x480 or 480x600 aspect ratio. They are much larger but
    : using 480 as a common denominator and comparing these pictures to other
    : camera pictures I see that my Canon XTi shoots 720x480 and my older Olympus
    : shoots 640x480. The wedding pics are all of different pixel dimensions but
    : the aspect remains very close to 480x600. For example one picture is
    : 1728x2160 and another is 2258x2823. I'm guessing that all of the pics were
    : cropped some and thus the different actual pixel sizes. But why are they all
    : 600x480 and 480x600 aspect? Does this size make for better printing to
    : standard paper size?
    : Per the exif data the camera is Canon EOS 20D.

    It sounds as though they were cropped for printing at 8x10 inches, or maybe
    16x20. I believe those are the only common printing sizes (in the US, at
    least) that use the 5:4 aspect ratio, of which 600x480 and the others your
    daughter's photographer used are examples.

    Most modern DSLRs (probably including the 20D) use the 3:2 aspect ratio, which
    was also that of most 35mm film cameras. AFAIK, the only common printing size
    at that aspect ratio is 4x6 inches. Older digicams typically used 4:3, the
    aspect ratio of a VGA computer screen. It's very likely that some still do,
    although my sense is that 4:3 is being displaced by 3:2. I never heard of a
    camera that used 5:4. While it's of doubtful relevance, that aspect ratio is
    widely used for moderately large computer screens (i.e., 1280x1024 pixels).

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jul 23, 2007
    #6
  7. DanR

    Marvin Guest

    It also works for viewing the pix on a non-HD TV.
     
    Marvin, Jul 23, 2007
    #7
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