what are the software steps from amateur to pro?

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by nerdz_r_us, Oct 16, 2004.

  1. nerdz_r_us

    nerdz_r_us Guest

    I am using Pinnacle Video Studio 9 and I want to learn how to use the REALLY
    good stuff (Adobe Premiere Pro?) to make professional looking DVD's (chroma
    keying, pip, blooper reels, dvd menus not from a template, filters, sound
    affects etc etc) that look professionally done.

    Here is my analogy. If I wanted to learn how to fly a plane I would not sit
    at the controls of 747 and expect to know what to do, I would obviously sit
    in a 1 prop Cesna and work my way up to the big planes. My question is this.
    What is the route one would take, in a software point of view, to learn how
    to make really good dvds? I am currently at Video Studio 9. What are your
    suggestions on the next level of software? What route did you take?

    Thank you to everyone who replies.
     
    nerdz_r_us, Oct 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. nerdz_r_us

    Mike Kujbida Guest


    No secret other than an interest in finding out "I wonder what happens when
    I do this?"
    My first NLE was the dpsVelocity (higher end than most of the ones used
    here). When I first got it, I sat down and started playing. It was at
    least a month before I even bothered to crack open the manual.

    Grab the demo versions of Premiere Pro, Vegas and Avid Express DV (if they
    have one) and start playing with them to see which one you're most
    comfortable with. My personal preference is Vegas but that's because I'm a
    long-time user of it (started with Vegas Audio and just moved up). The
    Vegas manual is available for download on the Sony site and it's free.
    There are numerous forums, books and training DVDs out there for all of
    these programs. The most important thing is to play and then play some
    more.

    Mike
     
    Mike Kujbida, Oct 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. nerdz_r_us

    nerdz_r_us Guest

    ---- snip ----
    Thanks for the reply Mike. So what you are saying is that there is no
    Intermediate level software to go to from what I am using now? The next step
    is to an upper level one like Premiere Pro or Vegas?

    I am really interested in a software that will allow me to make my own DVD
    menus from scratch, edit the sounds in the movie, put in some special
    affects (chroming?), etc. Vegas + DVD Suitte looks interesting. I might give
    that one a try. Thanks again for the reply. Wish me luck.

    Paul
     
    nerdz_r_us, Oct 17, 2004
    #3
  4. Many people wouldn't consider Premiere Pro or Vegas to be
    "upper level". I am not that snobbish as a Premiere 6.5 user,
    but I am not doing broadcast stuff either (where most is cut on
    Avid, etc. I believe)
    I have found Adobe Encore to be quite flexible in giving
    you complete control over the look and functionality of
    menus, etc. Encore has worked first-time, every-time right
    out of the box for me where several hundred $$$ worth of
    other DVD authoring applications were unable to produce
    even one usable disk. At least that was my experience.
    There are free applications like Audacity that do a quite
    respectable job of fancy audio editing. And Adobe Audition
    (ne. CoolEdit Pro) is used by many for professional audio
    editing. There are more professional-level (and consequently
    more expensive) audio editing apps like Pro-Tools, etc.
    Successful chroma-keying is as much a function of production
    elements (camera, recording format, lighting, etc.) almost more
    than anything to do with post-production (special effects, editing,
    etc.) Look up discussion of using DV for chroma-keying.
    The 4:1:1 sampling rate of NTSC-DV makes keying look
    pretty ratty (but some have done reasonably respectable work
    with green as a key color). Is the 4:2:0 sampling rate of PAL-DV
    any better?
    Remember that there are two parts of your education.
    One is learning the techniques, the other is how to execute
    these techniques with a particular application software.
    Obviously, the first one is independent of what software
    you are using and cumulative.

    If you have good enough hardware to run on, the free
    versions of Avid DV Express (for video) and Pro-Tools
    Free (for audio) might be good things to acquire.
     
    Richard Crowley, Oct 17, 2004
    #4
  5. nerdz_r_us

    Mike Kujbida Guest



    No. The next step is to educate yourself a whole lot more before you spend
    any money.
    Have you gotten out of it all that your current NLE software offers or are
    you still playing on the surface of it?
    Go to sites such as www.videoguys.com and www.videohelp.com and read the
    articles/reviews on various capturing and editing software.
    Lurk here for a few weeks and see what other kinds of software folks are
    using and what their overall likes/dislikes are.
    Go to the various manufacturer-hosted user forums and see what folks have to
    say about it.



    I do wish you luck Paul. I also encourage you to "do your homework" before
    you spend any money to make sure that you're getting exactly what you
    want.You've only gotten 2 responses so far and, IMO, that's not enough to
    warrant making a major purchase decision. That's why I suggested
    downloading trial versions of the various software. Most trial versions
    restrict you in some way (no saving of files, for eg.) so that's something
    else to be aware of.

    Mike
     
    Mike Kujbida, Oct 17, 2004
    #5

  6. There's no point in buying software in steps. Premiere or Vegas (if
    you don't know Vegas, take a look) can do the simple things.

    Note that 99% of professional video DOESN'T use clever tricks. Watch
    one of your favourite movies. Quite likely you've just spent 90
    minutes and seen nothing more than cuts and an occasional crossfade.
    Now watch an amateur video from someone who's just bought Premiere and
    used every tricksy effect going. Annoying, isn't it? :)

    Who do you want to be? Eisenstein, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder? Or
    to produce MTV videos, frantically grabbing any eye-catching trick to
    disguise that the basic material is boring?
     
    Laurence Payne, Oct 17, 2004
    #6
  7. nerdz_r_us

    Videoguy Guest

    As a Pinnacle Studio owner you can upgrade to Liquid Edition for
    $299.95. This is a fantastic deal. LE6 will give you all of the
    features you are looking for, and then some. Liquid Edition will
    allow you to edit your video and author your DVD from the timeline. LE
    6 will also allow you to capture and edit in MPEG2. You can also
    capture and edit HDV (the new prosumer hi-def format).

    http://www.videoguys.com/edition.html

    As a next step up you do have other choices:

    Premiere Pro & Encore DVD can be purchased together for $499.95 as
    part of the Pyro Professional bundle. Premiere Pro is great, and
    you'll find that together with Encore DVD & Audition, you'll have all
    the features you are looking for.

    Vegas 5 + DVD is one heck of a product. It has a very different look &
    feel from other NLEs. This is because it is based on digital audio
    editing software. Some folks take to it very quickly, wehile othewrs
    find it harder to get a hold of. We include some great training in our
    bundle, which will easily get you up & going.

    Avid Xpress DV gets you strated editing the Avid way. That's the same
    way over 75% of broadcast shows are done. From a pure editing point of
    view (cutting, trimming and managing clips) nothing compares. Once
    again, you'll want some training to get you going, and we include it
    free for you to get started.

    I feel I should also mention Ulead Media Studio pro. I don';t consider
    it as stable or professional as the 4 apps mentioned above, but it is
    very easy to use, and has the features you are looking for.

    I've got an old articvle on our website that compares Vegas 4, Edition
    5, Premiere pro and Avid. While it's not the latest version, I think
    you'll still find it quite informative
    http://www.videoguys.com/RT5.html

    I hope to have an updated version of this article posted in November.

    Gary




    Videoguys.com 800 323-2325
    We are the Digital Video Editing & DVD Production Experts!
    For all the latest NLE,DVD & HDV news check out the Videoguys Blog http://www.videoguys.com/blog/
     
    Videoguy, Oct 17, 2004
    #7
  8. nerdz_r_us

    nerdz_r_us Guest

    WOW!!. Some great advice from obviously talented people. I have taken all
    advice on board, will do a ton of homework, and check out the mentioned
    websites. I obviously need to do alot of homework here before moving forward
    and I dearly thank everyone for taking time to write down their thoughts.
    Good on ya mate.

    Paul


    http://www.videoguys.com/blog/
     
    nerdz_r_us, Oct 17, 2004
    #8
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