What are your thoughts on Vista?

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by mark_digital©, Dec 16, 2006.

  1. mark_digital©

    ASAAR Guest

    What makes you think that the internet started in 1995? Was that
    when the first web browser appeared for the Mac? Long before Win95
    was released I was accessing the internet using Win3x and assorted
    add-ons, such as Internet-In-A-Box. And before that, even before
    the web, was accessing usenet newsgroups using text based programs
    under DOS. Even CP/M users could access the internet. Ever hear of
    Tin? FWIW, usenet news programs were running as early as 1981.

    http://www.demillo.com/internet_history.htm
     
    ASAAR, Dec 21, 2006
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  2. mark_digital©

    J. Clarke Guest

    Unix also has apps that have to be installed from a root account. Depends
    on what the app does--if it has a service that legitimately has to run
    from a privileged account then there's no other way to do it. But I don't
    know of any Microsoft applications other than those providing system
    services that crash and burn when run from a user account.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 21, 2006
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  3. mark_digital©

    J. Clarke Guest

    You mean that Macs get PC virii? If so that pretty well shoots down the
    whole "Macs are secure" argument.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 21, 2006
  4. mark_digital©

    Cynicor Guest

    Important apps like Zoo Tycoon had the problem.


    http://www.microsoft.com/games/zootycoon/zoo1/faq_technical.asp

    There is finally a solution to a Windows XP issue that was making life
    difficult for a lot of gamers. The bug caused the game to request that
    the original disc be placed in the drive, even if the disc was already
    present. Players who do not have administrator privileges were being
    locked out of some necessary files and were unable to start up certain
    games. Now there's a fix available for download.

    Note that to run this fix, your Windows XP login name must have
    administrator permissions. Most primary users have this setting. To
    check, navigate to your Control Panel and double-click User Accounts.
    Look for the word "administrators" under the Group column.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 21, 2006
  5. Well, it took a day when DSC (disk save and compress?) was the only
    available tool. Stand-alone backup was a lot better! Dual 120MB
    hard-drives were a luxury we couldn't afford then. One RA80 (IIRC) and
    later an RA81. Even an RA82 (again IIRC). 622MB! Soon after that
    5.25-inch SCSI disks in shoeboxes became available - as much as 1GB (again
    IIRC). I actually have an RZ26 here (removed from an old system).

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 21, 2006
  6. I didn't know (or had forgotten) it was that version. I still have the
    IDSM on my bookshelf - V5.2, though. VMS Internals and Data Structures
    Manual. It's good that similar books are produced for Windows as well.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 21, 2006
  7. When has a Mac caught a virus from a PC?
     
    Christopher Campbell, Dec 21, 2006
  8. mark_digital©

    Cynicor Guest

    That's a silly question, since it's now well determined here that
    despite security holes and update patches, it is impossible for a Mac to
    catch a virus.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 21, 2006
  9. mark_digital©

    J. Clarke Guest

    They aren't the ones perpetuating it. It's the software developers who
    write crappy code that needs to install in system areas and won't run
    without privileged access. Microsoft has tightened the defaults with each
    new version and every time a bunch of applications have been broken by the
    tightened defaults with the result that users scream bloody murder about
    "compatibility problems" when in fact the problem is security defaults.

    Eventually Microsoft will get the developers beaten into submission, at
    least one hopes they will.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 21, 2006
  10. mark_digital©

    J. Clarke Guest

    That's not one that was developed in-house by Microsoft, they just market
    it. Somebody at Microsoft does need to take a hard look at their
    marketing policies though--somebody should have beaten Blue Fang Games
    about the head and neck for requiring such a thing.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 21, 2006
  11. mark_digital©

    Cynicor Guest

    Well let's discuss them anyway. This thread is in danger of dying from
    neglect. :D
     
    Cynicor, Dec 21, 2006
  12. Not usually. I can think of two cases where that could occur:
    1) A Mac running Windows (either via dual boot or virtualization) gets
    that copy of Windows infected. The infection is most likely contained
    within the Windows partition (without add-on software, XP can't mount
    Mac-formatted HFS+ volumes). Possibly, a virus that does nasty things to
    the partition table could impact the Mac side of the machine, but that's
    about it.

    2) A Mac running Office or similar gets a macro-based virus. Calling
    that a 'PC virus' is a bit of a stretch.

    -dms
     
    Daniel Silevitch, Dec 21, 2006
  13. Hmm. Joel Spolsky writes well and makes at least some amount of sense.

    But, Hehe. I feel your pain.

    Back in the DOS days when I got my first 32-bit Intel based machine, I wrote
    a Life program that uses assembler to calculate cells in parallel: a 32-word
    block of memory holds a 28x28 region of space, and I calculate 28 cells in
    some insanely small number of 32-bit instructions. Since DOS was only 16
    bits, I used a "DOS Extender" (Watcom, maybe), which is an incredibly
    outrageous kludge.

    It still runs. Under XP. Unbelievable.

    On the other hand, the home-brew app I actually use, an "RTF text editor" I
    use for all my translation work (Word Basic is such an abomination that it
    was easier to write an editor from scratch than recode my favorite editing
    macros in WB), needs some more work. But it won't happen because I'd have to
    learn all the tools all over again, and lots of the fine print has changed.
    And the Rich Edit Control is no longer sexy (non-internet-enabled standalone
    apps are so last century), so there isn't a lot of information on it in
    current books and web pages. Sigh.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
     
    David J. Littleboy, Dec 22, 2006
  14. Gore's strength is honesty? ROFLMAO!
     
    Peter A. Stavrakoglou, Dec 22, 2006
  15. mark_digital©

    Cynicor Guest

    They were using the phrase "information superhighway" in 1993-4. I
    remember this clearly because I was so pissed at the local WCBS
    newscaster who said "another glitch on the information superhighway
    tonight as several ATMs in Queens went down."
     
    Cynicor, Dec 22, 2006
  16. mark_digital©

    Cynicor Guest

    If nothing else, a firewall will help you work through a DoS attack.
     
    Cynicor, Dec 22, 2006
  17. mark_digital©

    ASAAR Guest

    So you're part of the demo that Apple targeted their "computer for
    the rest of us" Mac ad campaign on . . . All that you really needed
    was a Bowmar Brain. :)
     
    ASAAR, Dec 22, 2006
  18. mark_digital©

    ASAAR Guest

    Fair enough. You did say "general public". But prior to 1995,
    most of the internet users weren't made up of the gov't associated
    workers, gearheads and hackers as some might have read into your
    claim, as the popularity of usenet back then indicated.
     
    ASAAR, Dec 22, 2006
  19. mark_digital©

    Bill Funk Guest

    Certainly.
    You have, as one example, gone from saying that there simply aren't
    any OS X virii to saying hat there aren't any in the wild, after being
    caught.
    So, yes, you are indeed a moving target when proved wrong.
    Another bold statement that simply isn't true.
    While it's true that OS X is less vilnerable than Windows, OS X's
    lower market share also helps keep it off the radar.
    And you won't find any unbiased source to say otherwise.
     
    Bill Funk, Dec 22, 2006
  20. mark_digital©

    Bill Funk Guest

    Which, of course, means absolutely nothing in the current thread.
    Why do you find it so necessary to present constantly changing
    statements?
    Oh, that's right: it's because most of your statements are just wrong,
    so you constantly need to change them.
    If you would just admit that OS X isn't as secure as you want to
    present it to be, we could all get along. Your constant need to make
    false statements does not do your credibility any good.
    IOW, you're hurting yourself.
    It's becoming painfully obvious that your zealotry is overcoming your
    common sense.
     
    Bill Funk, Dec 22, 2006
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