What Does The Phrase "Shoot Sans Flash" Mean?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by rob, Oct 17, 2004.

  1. rob

    rob Guest

    In message <ckuv0s$95m$> - "Paul" <>
    writes:
    :>
    :>What does the phrase "Shoot Sans Flash" mean?
    :>
    :>Cheers
    :>
    :>

    It means "shoot without flash". Sans is a french word.

    Rob
    www.rcp.ca
     
    rob, Oct 17, 2004
    #1
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  2. rob

    Paul Guest

    What does the phrase "Shoot Sans Flash" mean?

    Cheers
     
    Paul, Oct 18, 2004
    #2
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  3. rob

    z-one-b Guest

    Ummm...unless that's an expression I don't know, it means "shoot without
    flash".
    «Sans» is french for without.
    eqw
     
    z-one-b, Oct 18, 2004
    #3
  4. rob

    Patrick L. Guest



    'Sans' is French for "without".
     
    Patrick L., Oct 18, 2004
    #4
  5. rob

    Paul Guest

    Cheers.

    Didn't realise it was so simple, but makes sense now.
     
    Paul, Oct 18, 2004
    #5
  6. You mean a FREEDOM word. ;)
     
    Brian C. Baird, Oct 18, 2004
    #6
  7. rob

    Mxsmanic Guest

    It means don't use flash (sans = without in French).
     
    Mxsmanic, Oct 18, 2004
    #7
  8. rob

    m II Guest



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    m II, Oct 19, 2004
    #8
  9. rob

    Apteryx Guest

    The only thing I would take issue with about that answer is the notion
    that "sans" is an exclusively French word. Like a good proportion of
    English words (eg "mutton", "sample", "invest") it has been in the
    English language since the Norman Conquest. Shakespeare used it in his
    7 ages of man speech in As You Like It ("Last scene of all, that ends
    this strange eventful history, is second childishness, and mere
    oblivion, sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans every thing).

    OTOH as an English word it is a bit out of fashion, probably to the
    point of now being archaic, but that needn't prevent even Republican
    Americans from using it without feeling it puts them under suspicion of
    French influence. They can just be old-fashioned (if they can get past
    the fact the "fashion" also comes from Old French "facon").
     
    Apteryx, Oct 21, 2004
    #9
  10. Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
    Before we too, into the Dust Descend;
    Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,
    Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and - sans End!

    Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
     
    William Graham, Oct 21, 2004
    #10
  11. Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
    Before we too, into the Dust Descend;
    Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,
    Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and - sans End!

    Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
     
    William Graham, Oct 21, 2004
    #11
  12. Ah, make the most of what we yet may spend,
    Before we too, into the Dust Descend;
    Dust into Dust, and under Dust, to lie,
    Sans Wine, sans Song, sans Singer, and - sans End!

    Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam
     
    William Graham, Oct 22, 2004
    #12
  13. rob

    Alan Browne Guest

    It is not exclusively French.
    http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary:

    "Main Entry: 1sans
    Pronunciation: 'sanz
    Function: preposition
    Etymology: Middle English saun, sans, from Middle French san, sans, modification
    of Latin sine without -- more at SUNDER
    : WITHOUT <my love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw -- Shakespeare>"

    were it exclusively French, the entry would say: "Usage: foreign term"
    It is not archaic. (it would be marked "archaic" in the def above)

    The sad fact in the English world, in particular the US, is that too many people
    watch television and too few people read books. And the people who write for
    television don't seem to read much at all.

    English is for the large part a bastard language, perhaps the most bastardized
    of all languages with the exception of Esperanto (which has no cultural or
    national origin at all). Words have survived in English from their original
    language, often without change.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Oct 22, 2004
    #13
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