What ever happened to Divx (Mpeg4)?

Discussion in 'Amateur Video Production' started by Brian, Jul 19, 2003.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Divx is a great format as the size of about 1 hour 50 minute video can
    fit on a single CD-R/RW disk and the quality is much better than VCD
    (and SVCD I think).
    Why have they stopped adding Divx to DVD players? (not the DVD player
    on a computer but the DVD player you connect to a television)

    I think there are only two DVD players that support the Divx format
    and I read somewhere that this format has been discontinued.

    Regards Brian
     
    Brian, Jul 19, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Brian

    Max Volume Guest

    You're confused. DIVX is a defunct means of "renting" DVDs. The name
    has been appropriated by pirates who can't afford a DVD burner as the
    name for the l33t codec they use (see also 'xviD').
     
    Max Volume, Jul 19, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Brian

    Ginchy Guest

    good read mate!

     
    Ginchy, Jul 19, 2003
    #3
  4. Brian

    Max Volume Guest

    And you just might wanna BLOW ME.

    DIVX and DivX have NOTHING to do with one another, which I pointed out.

    DivX first became popular as a means to distrbute films online
    illegally. As you point out, it's only real purpose is to facilitate
    the distribution of films over the internet. Whether it started out as
    a "legal" project at Microsoft or not or whether it's now been
    reclaimed as an "official" codec is of no consequence. My comments
    stand.
     
    Max Volume, Jul 19, 2003
    #4
  5. Brian

    Dean Richard Guest

    Hi,

    Your message is well-written and very informative, but I want to
    update your last comment. There are now DVD players hitting the market
    that support Divx and other Mpg4 based formats. While not all Divx
    files play, compatibility is pretty good. Here's a URL of someone who
    wrote a review of the new LiteOn DVD drive:

    http://www.kitsapcomputers.com/lvd2001.htm

    Supposedly it can be found for $140 or so.

    One final question/comment. Is Divx really open source? I thought XVid
    was the open source MP4 compatible codec. I was under the (possibly
    mistaken) impression that Divx had become a closed commercial entity.

    Dean
     
    Dean Richard, Jul 19, 2003
    #5
  6. Brian

    Max Volume Guest

    Your rebuttal of my so-called "misinformation" is probably leading the
    original poster to believe that DIVX and DivX are one in the same.
    Sounds like the pot calling the kettle black to me.
     
    Max Volume, Jul 20, 2003
    #6
  7. Brian

    Erik Harris Guest

    Ahh, yes, the RIAA explanation.. If some people use it illegally, it MUST be
    a bad thing. DivX is therefore evil, MP3 is therefore evil.. CD-R, VHS
    tape, and audio cassette are also therefore evil (at least in the case of VHS
    and audio tapes, the media execs made that argument).

    :)

    --
    Erik Harris [email protected]$harrishom$.com
    AIM: KngFuJoe http://www.eharrishome.com
    Chinese-Indonesian MA Club http://www.eharrishome.com/cimac/

    The above email address is obfuscated to try to prevent SPAM.
    Replace each dollar sign with an "e" for the correct address.
     
    Erik Harris, Jul 20, 2003
    #7
  8. Brian

    Max Volume Guest

    I never said DivX was illegal, and I do cringe whenever some idiot says
    they don't listen to MP3s because "they're illegal". I was simply
    explaining how the format came into prominence. Deny it all you want,
    but it is simply a tool for opportunistic (and lazy) pirates.
     
    Max Volume, Jul 20, 2003
    #8
  9. Are you really so clueless? Divx is used for video encoding
    in many pc games. Warcraft 3 come to mind. Any video codec
    is simply a tool. Users determine whether it is used legally.
     
    Nobody_of_Consequence, Jul 20, 2003
    #9
  10. Why should you cringe? By your logic, mpeg layer 3
    audio should also be "simply a tool for opportunistic
    (and lazy) pirates." It obviously would have no legitimate
    use along with any video or audio codec in existence.

    There is no denying that video pirates do use divx,
    along with mpeg audio and video and uther codecs.
    However you cannot deny there are perfectly legitimate
    uses for all these codecs including Divx. To do so
    irrationally ignories reality.
     
    Nobody_of_Consequence, Jul 20, 2003
    #10
  11. Brian

    i'm_tired Guest

    Wow. You really don't know. I thought you were just being an elitist jerk,
    but it turns out, you actually are uneduacted on this particular matter. If
    I hadn't described it so clearly in my first reply, I would apologize for
    coming on so strong.... but I did describe it quite well. So, I'll go into
    clearer detail for your benefit (or you can skip directly to the last
    paragraph where I will make note of exactly your comment that proves you
    knew what the OP was asking about and etc)

    OK. Here we go again: Jerome Rota developed ASF for Microsoft. The first
    legit use for ASF was actually DIVX rental disks through Circuit City
    because of the DRM capabilities built into streaming ASF even from hard
    media. The DRM was used to limit renters ability to use the disks to 48
    hours. See here: http://www.fightdivx.com/anticompetition.htm . If you
    will recall, I specifically mentioned the audio sync problems DivX/DIVX/ASF
    had due to its extra data necessary for streaming and DRM capabilities.

    Jerome Rota left Microsoft with some of his work - that Microsoft may or may
    not have intellectual or actual property rights to. That is for some court
    to decide. Rota says he developed the code released to the masses before
    working for Microsoft and Microsoft says that he can't use any of his
    knowledge in the field of audio or video compression for the rest of his
    life or any of his knowledge from before he worked for Microsoft because
    they own the part of his brain that produces such things because he worked
    for them at one time (my own words, but I bet you get the meaning).

    So, the ASF code was named the DIVX format for Circuit City DIVX rental
    disks and was then called DivX by those who began work on improving the
    codec and removing streaming and DRM capabilities from it to fix the
    inherent audio sync problems. At one time ASF = DIVX = DivX. Today ASF =
    ASF. DIVX may be defunct, but happens to have evolved into DivX and both
    stemmed from ASF. Today, DivX no longer contains ASF code, but that is
    where it was likely conceived. So, ASF did = DIVX and at the same time also
    equalled DivX <period>. DivX later went through an evolution under Project
    Mayo which resulted in the removal of any ASF code and is now a legit and
    legal format/codec. DIVX = DivX until Project Mayo. Symantically DIVX
    should then be considered defunct, but you and I both know that the OP
    referred to the only DivX he knows about which is what you said was only
    used by hackers and that you said those hackers had " appropriated" the name
    of. In all actuality, the fellow who began with the lower case letters is
    no hacker, but rather a very well respected cryptographer and also was a
    well known mathmatics professor at Berkeley (yes the Berkeley where all the
    US Govt research is done and where FreeBSD is developed). I'll let your
    fingers do the walking at google for his name because I can't remember how
    it is spelled.

    Lastly for this particular longer-than-necessary reply, please see your
    comment saying, "see also XviD". You did say that, yes? Please return to
    your first post on the matter and tell me if you think DivX = XviD. So, you
    said hackers appropriated the name DIVX and turned it into DivX and XviD.
    Hmmm. Got Google? Let's recap the facts just to make googling easy for
    you. ASF at one time was developed specifically as the DIVX format for
    Circuit City rental disks. ASF may or may not have been stolen but its
    code and platform was certainly used to create DivX, but those streaming and
    DRM capabilities made DIVX/DivX an inferior product because of audio sync
    issues tied to the excess data. So, DivX underwent big changes and now no
    longer resembles ASF, but that is a rather recent development in the time
    line. DivX (your proclaimed tool belonging only to hackers) existed from
    the same exact code as DIVX (what you say is only a rental format) and the
    code for both of them was Microsoft ASF. So, all at the same time, the
    three names DIVX, DivX, and ASF existed and were more than roughly identicle
    to one another. Here is what we can certainly say, just to make things even
    more confusing: XviD is even more recent than anything else we have
    discussed. XviD exists from the new DivX under GNU but XviD can also be
    used to describe a method for employing the use of a codec and not just a
    codec itself. XviD never ever = ASF. DivX and DIVX both at one time = ASF.
    So, what name did hackers "appropriate"? What does DivX mean that DIVX does
    not mean? And, what did you really think that XviD was? See where I'm
    going with this? DivX = DIVX but does not = XviD. DIVX = DivX but does not
    = XviD. ASF once = DIVX and also DivX but never had anything to do with
    XviD because of where on the timeline that XviD comes in. Simple stuff and
    it could have been well explained with less than 50% the number of words....
    oh, wait. It was once, wasn't it? Oh, yes. I remember now. Back when I
    replied to you the first time.... yup sure enough.
     
    i'm_tired, Jul 20, 2003
    #11
  12. Brian

    Keith Clark Guest

    By your definition, the Internet itself is "simply a tool for
    opportunistic (and lazy) pirates".
     
    Keith Clark, Jul 20, 2003
    #12
  13. Brian

    Max Volume Guest

    Oh, come on. If you're going to insult me, at least be original.
     
    Max Volume, Jul 20, 2003
    #13
  14. Brian

    Max Volume Guest

    It often is, so what's your point?
     
    Max Volume, Jul 20, 2003
    #14
  15. What insult? EH's comments seem to aptly describe you post.
    Are you intentionally goading reader in this group with
    your ridiculous post?

    Are you intentinally goading readers in ths group, "Max Volume"
     
    Nobody_of_Consequence, Jul 21, 2003
    #15
  16. Brian

    i'm_tired Guest

    Max Volume wrote:
    Self abuser then, eh? Can't stand yourself?
     
    i'm_tired, Jul 21, 2003
    #16
  17. Which is one of the reasons why I think they will not have a long life, at least not in
    the "official" world.
    I made a small 3D animation for a client in DivX, and they wanted to have all legal
    matters checked thoroughly. That's when I discovered that there was a licensing fee for
    such codec usage. It turned out that their lowest fee was quite a lot more than what I got
    for making the entire animation! We chose wmv instead.
    Apart from that DivX is constantly causing problems, both when playing back where the
    sound is lost/stuck etc, but also its inability to be used with my favourite video editor
    Vegas Video which can read/use about all formats/codecs except for DivX.
    Another stupid thing that those DivX guys did was when they added their logo flashing up
    at the start of every DivX encoded movie. Very stupid IMO. I know that it can be turned
    off by delving deep into the settings, but that isn't good enough.
    They may be good coders, but IMO that isn't enough.
    I guess it's just another story where greed causes another collapse like the dot-com
    bubble.

    -- Bjørn K. Nilssen --
     
    Bjørn K Nilssen, Jul 21, 2003
    #17
  18. Which is one of the reasons why I think they will not have a long life, at least not in
    the "official" world.
    I made a small 3D animation for a client in DivX, and they wanted to have all legal
    matters checked thoroughly. That's when I discovered that there was a licensing fee for
    such codec usage. It turned out that their lowest fee was quite a lot more than what I got
    for making the entire animation! We chose wmv instead.
    Apart from that DivX is constantly causing problems, both when playing back where the
    sound is lost/stuck etc, but also its inability to be used with my favourite video editor
    Vegas Video which can read/use about all formats/codecs except for DivX.
    Another stupid thing that those DivX guys did was when they added their logo flashing up
    at the start of every DivX encoded movie. Very stupid IMO. I know that it can be turned
    off by delving deep into the settings, but that isn't good enough.
    They may be good coders, but IMO that isn't enough.
    I guess it's just another story where greed causes another collapse like the dot-com
    bubble.

    -- Bjørn K. Nilssen --
     
    Bjørn K Nilssen, Jul 21, 2003
    #18
  19. Which is one of the reasons why I think they will not have a long life, at least not in
    the "official" world.
    I made a small 3D animation for a client in DivX, and they wanted to have all legal
    matters checked thoroughly. That's when I discovered that there was a licensing fee for
    such codec usage. It turned out that their lowest fee was quite a lot more than what I got
    for making the entire animation! We chose wmv instead.
    Apart from that DivX is constantly causing problems, both when playing back where the
    sound is lost/stuck etc, but also its inability to be used with my favourite video editor
    Vegas Video which can read/use about all formats/codecs except for DivX.
    Another stupid thing that those DivX guys did was when they added their logo flashing up
    at the start of every DivX encoded movie. Very stupid IMO. I know that it can be turned
    off by delving deep into the settings, but that isn't good enough.
    They may be good coders, but IMO that isn't enough.
    I guess it's just another story where greed causes another collapse like the dot-com
    bubble.

    -- Bjørn K. Nilssen --
     
    Bjørn K Nilssen, Jul 21, 2003
    #19
  20. Brian

    Jerome Marot Guest

    There are more than 2 stand-alone DVD players that support the Divx ;)
    codecs. Most of them uses the KISS chipset, using this keyword in
    google should give you the names of the players.
     
    Jerome Marot, Jul 21, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.