What happened to the 1 and 2 meg pro DSLRs?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Remember the Kodaks, Nikons and Canons that sported
    that many pixels, and cost something like $10,000-$25,000 each?
    I'm wondering if people ever sell on the used market, or are
    they just gathering dust?
    -Rich
     
    RichA, Jul 29, 2005
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Siggy Guest

    In
    Do you ever check eBay? ;-)
     
    Siggy, Jul 29, 2005
    #2
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  3. RichA

    Charlie Self Guest

    Check Ebay. Nikon D1s (2.6 MP) are selling for somewhere between $350
    and $1200.
     
    Charlie Self, Jul 29, 2005
    #3
  4. Who on earth is buying them..?!
     
    Craig Marston, Jul 29, 2005
    #4
  5. RichA

    Norm Dresner Guest

    Well ... While my main camera bag has a D70 and an N90 in it, I walk around
    all day with a Coolpix 2200 (2MB) in my jacket pocket. It's certainly no
    competition for the DSLRs but the 2 MP images print up incredibly
    respectably 4x5 (4x6) prints and the color is similarly great. If the price
    dropped to even $250, I'd consider buying one for my wife to carry around
    while I'm shooting the more expensive cameras since she complains that I
    never photograph what she sees and wouldn't consider spending much money for
    a companion camera for herself [which she had and often enjoyed decades ago
    when we shot Minolta].

    It's still Nikon and it's still the same lenses I'm using so it sounds
    quite plausible to watch for a price drop.

    Norm
     
    Norm Dresner, Jul 29, 2005
    #5
  6. RichA

    Charlie Self Guest

    Some mighty fine photos have come out of those cameras. At 350 or 450
    bucks, they might make an ideal back-up camera for the newer Nikons,
    and they also might make good cameras to place in situations where
    they're used as more or less disposable auto firing, or remoted fired,
    cameras, where destruction or major damage is a possibility. It's one
    helluva lot more economical than having a 5K body wiped out.
     
    Charlie Self, Jul 29, 2005
    #6
  7. RichA

    Tony Polson Guest


    They are more than good enough for 99% of PJ work.

    For newspaper work, any more than 2.7 MP is overkill.

    ;-)
     
    Tony Polson, Jul 29, 2005
    #7
  8. RichA

    Bubbabob Guest

    Most of these cameras were huge, heavy battery hogs and VERY slow. We had a
    Fujix 505 (same camera as the Nikon E2N) at work that we paid $15,000
    dollars for new. 1.2 megapixels. A turd of a camera when it was new and
    less than a doorstop now.
     
    Bubbabob, Jul 30, 2005
    #8
  9. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Should keep it for the Digital Camera Museum!
     
    RichA, Jul 30, 2005
    #9
  10. RichA

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    [ ... ]
    Well ... I have a couple of NC2000e/c cameras. They started
    live as Nikon N90s film cameras, to which Kodak fitted a digital back
    (and lots of circuitry below the original base of the camera). The
    weight was staggering. :) This was designed for the AP, to let their
    photographers use the Nikon glass that they already had, but to shoot
    digital.

    Only 1.3 MP images -- saved in a RAW format only in the camera.
    Needed a special plug in for PhotoShop to convert it to anything else.
    (Though the unix "dcraw" program will *almost* do it. It seems to
    exchange color channels for whatever reason. :)

    The batteries were non-interchangeable, and had to be charged in
    the camera. Battery life between charges was minimal compared to my
    Nikon D70.

    However -- *slow* it was not. ISO from 200 to 1600, autofocus
    was what the N90s gave (quite quick), switch it on as you are lifting it
    to your eyes, and it is ready to shoot by the time you get the subject
    framed.

    Yes -- write time to the PCMCIA hard disks was slower than a
    Lexar 1GB 80X CF card, but those weren't available back then.
    The NC2000e/c could be converted back to the N90s film camera
    with a replacement camera back, so it is not just a doorstop in any
    case.

    Some of them had a focusing screen with a black border showing
    the crop factor -- others blanked out the outer area of the finder
    screen. I prefer the former, as it gives me a clue what is about to
    come into the field of view.

    Enjoy,
    DoN.
     
    DoN. Nichols, Jul 31, 2005
    #10
  11. RichA

    Father Kodak Guest

    Don,

    This raises an obvious question. What if you have an N90s camera?
    Can you get one of these backs - cheap - ? What is the crop factor?
     
    Father Kodak, Jul 31, 2005
    #11
  12. Yes, they come up for auction on ebay on a regular basis.
    Varies with the model. I belive the 1.6 Mpx - 2 Mpx models had a
    crop factor of 2.6x, while the 6 Mpx versions had a crop factor
    of 1.3x. I own and still sometimes use, one of the latter.

    You can see an image of it here:
    http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/dcs460.html

    As you can see the digital back adds some bulk to the Nikon.

    I've always considered the N90s as one of the best bodies produced by
    Nikon, and the Kodak digital back lets me shoot digital with it.
     
    Gisle Hannemyr, Jul 31, 2005
    #12
  13. <snip>

    I like the sound of that!! <grin>
     
    Craig Marston, Jul 31, 2005
    #13
  14. RichA

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    I got my first one at a hamfest, for what appeared to be a very
    good price compared to the new price -- about $700, after I had seen
    them being sold for $14.4k earlier and passed on the option.

    This was about the time that the AP dumped the lot, having moved
    up to more modern (and higher resolution) cameras.

    I got a second one from eBay (N90 not N90s body, FWIW) for
    around $200.00.
    From the PDF file of the manual, in order of crop factor:

    Camera Crop MP
    -----------------------------
    DCS 460 1.3 6.23
    NC2000e 1.65 1.28
    DCS-410 2.6 1.54
    DCS-420 2.6 1.54

    Of those the NC2000e was made specifically for the AP, and as a
    result had a couple of extra features:

    1) It had a microphone and button in the back to allow voice
    annotation of the images

    2) It had provisions for connecting to a cell phone, so you could
    submit your images to the office from wherever you were.
    I've never used it with film, but I certainly liked the camera
    body as used in the NC2000e. Someday, I need to get a standard back for
    one of mine and try it with film.

    Enjoy,
    DoN.
     
    DoN. Nichols, Jul 31, 2005
    #14
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