What you see is always quite what gets you:

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Eric Stevens, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. Eric Stevens

    PeterN Guest

    Cops are human. That guy probably should not have been a cop, or he had
    a breakdown.
     
    PeterN, Sep 18, 2013
    #61
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  2. Eric Stevens

    PeterN Guest

    Especially if you want to profit from the sale of the picture.
     
    PeterN, Sep 18, 2013
    #62
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  3. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    I believe option #1 applies.
     
    Savageduck, Sep 18, 2013
    #63
  4. Eric Stevens

    J. Clarke Guest

    Unfortunately there seems to be far too much of that going around. Ex-
    soldiers who don't understand the difference between "military" and
    "paramilitary" or between foreign enemies and citizen suspects.
     
    J. Clarke, Sep 19, 2013
    #64
  5. Eric Stevens

    Tony Cooper Guest

    Well, the gun people don't understand what an "organized militia" is
    and that there isn't one.
     
    Tony Cooper, Sep 19, 2013
    #65
  6. Eric Stevens

    Alfred Molon Guest

    How else can the perception be skewed through a camera if not looking
    through a viewfinder?
     
    Alfred Molon, Sep 19, 2013
    #66
  7. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    Try being fixated on the LCD screen, particularly if the camera is not
    one with either an OVF, or EVF. For all I know he might have been
    shooting with a phone.
     
    Savageduck, Sep 19, 2013
    #67
  8. Eric Stevens

    Eric Stevens Guest

    Your question is answered.

    See
     
    Eric Stevens, Sep 21, 2013
    #68
  9. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    Aah! An Indian idiot.
     
    Savageduck, Sep 21, 2013
    #69
  10. Eric Stevens

    Tony Cooper Guest

    When I was a kid, we lived near a railroad bridge over a fairly wide
    creek. We - the other neighborhood kids and I - used to walk out on
    the bridge and crawl down through the cross-ties to a cement support
    column. When a train was coming, we used to stand on the support
    column with our heads above the cross-ties and see who could remain
    that way the longest as the train approached.

    It was kinda cool to crouch down below the cross-ties as the train
    rumbled overhead. Frightening and noisy, but cool.

    I do not claim to have had very much sense at that age.
     
    Tony Cooper, Sep 21, 2013
    #70
  11. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! We used to do the old penny flattening thing.
    Didn't you know, kids are immortal?
    ....and take astonishing risks before they learn from experience.

    Back in our "junior chemist" days (10-14) there were a few of us who
    did some very risky "explosive" things. It was great to be able to make
    things go "BANG!" Until one of us screwing around on his own, had a
    test tube explode in his face, costing him an eye.
     
    Savageduck, Sep 21, 2013
    #71
  12. Eric Stevens

    George Kerby Guest

    Yep. Don't let teen boys anywhere near potassium nitrate and sulfur...
     
    George Kerby, Sep 21, 2013
    #72
  13. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    Oh! We used to make a crude thermite with a simple mix; 1/3 potassium
    nitrate, 1/3 sulfur, & 1/3 aluminum paint powder. Then we would ignite
    it with a chemical fuse, some potassium permanganate on top of the mix
    with one or two drops of glycerine. That would give about 20-30 seconds
    to ignition.

    Our fathers' old metal cigar tubes made great mini-bombs! ;-)
     
    Savageduck, Sep 21, 2013
    #73
  14. Eric Stevens

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I didn't allow my son to do many of the things that I was free to do,
    and my son doesn't allow my grandsons to do many of the things he was
    allowed to do.

    That doesn't mean that my son didn't do those things. I just means
    that he didn't do them with my knowledge. My son will probably say
    the same thing about his sons in a few years.
     
    Tony Cooper, Sep 22, 2013
    #74
  15. Eric Stevens

    PeterN Guest

    We used to nitrate toluene under the "supervision" of our chemistry
    teacher. For safety we did it in an ice surrounded flask, under a hood.
    One of the guys was in a hurry and he applied heat from a Bunsen burner
    to speed up the reaction. We all survived.
     
    PeterN, Sep 22, 2013
    #75
  16. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    "Nitrate toluene"?
    Toluene can certainly be reactive given the right combination of acid +
    potassium salts, but my most common path lab usage for it (in my other
    life) was as a wax solvent for wax mounted tissue samples prior to
    autotome slicing for slide mounting. I wouldn't want to use it indoors
    without a fume hood.
     
    Savageduck, Sep 22, 2013
    #76
  17. Eric Stevens

    PeterN Guest

    The purpose of the experiment was to make nitrotoluene, for use as a
    reagent. As a result of the heating the normal three step reaction was
    sped up and he would up with TNT. Which fortunately did not og off.

    <http://www.ch.ic.ac.uk/vchemlib/mim/bristol/tnt/tnt_text.htm>
     
    PeterN, Sep 22, 2013
    #77
  18. Eric Stevens

    J. Clarke Guest

    As in "TNT", I believe.
     
    J. Clarke, Sep 22, 2013
    #78
  19. Eric Stevens

    PeterN Guest

    1/3 right. But since you are so arrogant as to claim to have plonked me,
    You did not get the right answer.
     
    PeterN, Sep 22, 2013
    #79
  20. Eric Stevens

    Savageduck Guest

    That would be trinitrotoluene C7H5N3O6 and I doubt that the full
    production process would have been a high school chemistry project.
    There is nitrotoluene or mononitrotoluene C6H4(CH3)(NO2) which is a
    somewhat different animal and could well have been considered for a
    project. A somewhat pointless project, but possible.
    ....and all start with toluene C7H8, a great solvent and paint
    remover(and not pleasant to be around), but "nitrate toluene" does not
    exist.
     
    Savageduck, Sep 22, 2013
    #80
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