What's the best bang for the buck?

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Allan, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. Allan

    Allan Guest

    Hi guys and gals.

    I have approx. $2000.00 to spend on a new DV camcorder.
    I know it's not a great deal to spend , but money, as always is a little
    tight. especially when you are a student.

    I want to record wedding video's.

    What's out there that would suit my needs and my low budget.
    I would like to get something that is half descent...

    Any suggestions would be great!

    Thanks in advance

    Allan form Canada
     
    Allan, Jan 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. I recently faced a similar choice. After months of research I decided
    on a Sony HCR-HC1, which is a 1 CMOS camera. It records HDV. Sells for
    $1499 at B & H. That's great!

    Low lighting is not great, but it's not terrible. (It would not be the
    ideal camera for weddings though). It's about average.

    It's a great learning camera because it lets you get into the HDV, but
    you can always use it simply to record regular SD (and you can always
    use the original footage later).

    The problems with HDV: it means buying a fancy HD Monitor (and maybe
    even TV), and prices on those are horrendous. Obviously there's no
    DVD's to show it on, although see my solution below. (Interestingly
    divx has divx-HD DVDs that are supposed to work to fit on a DVd player)


    The two options I considered were Sony VX2100 (for exceptional low
    lighting--ideal for weddings) and Panasonic GS-400. VX2100 cost around
    2000-2100, and there's a lot of extras. Panasonic GS-400 costs around
    $1100, lots of features, great 3CCD, but mediocre for low-lighting.

    There's a lot to be said for shooting in traditional SD video for your
    budget and using the extra dough to buy a super tripod/microphone, etc.
    You don't spend much on the camera itself, learn the ropes and by the
    time you are comfortable with all that, the High Def cameras have all
    come down under 2000$ (and when there's actually demand for HD video).

    then again, i could afford the extras required to do HDV (even though I
    won't have a good monitor solution. Believe it or not, I'm going to buy
    linkplayer
    http://www.iodata.com/products/products.php?cat=HNP&sc=AVEL&ts=2&tsc=15&sc=AVEL&pId=AVLP2/DVDLA06

    to connect to my HDTV. I'm going to put my high def files on a usb hard
    drive which I'm going to hook up to the linkplayer to view on HDTV.
    this is not an ideal solution, but one I'm probably stuck with until
    the cost of monitors come down.

    Those are my thoughts. And Good Luck.


    robert Nagle
    Houston, Texas
    idiotprogrammer
    http://www.imaginaryplanet.net/weblogs/idiotprogrammer/
     
    idiotprogrammer, Jan 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. idiotprogrammer, Jan 28, 2006
    #3
  4. I recently bought two sony PD-150s on Ebay for $900.00 each. Both in
    excellent condition and over half the drum life left. These were $4000.00
    cameras new. If you buy used, you can get a great 3CCD camera with balanced
    audio inputs and still have enough money to buy a Sennheiser wireless mic
    system, a necessity for any wedding videographer.

    Best Regards
     
    Bailey The Dog, Jan 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Allan

    Nappy Guest

    hmm... decide which format you want to deal with first.. and then.. if it is
    DV get a used Panasonic AGDVX100A.

    I don't like to recommend the HDV stuff yet. Of course.. there's absolutely
    no real reason to take my advice either.
     
    Nappy, Jan 29, 2006
    #5
  6. Allan

    doc Guest

    you can pick up a panasonic dvc60 for the money ur talking and have money
    left over for other things like mics. it's not the top of the line but a
    great entry 3 of 6 levels in 4:3, 3 ccd camera and it will do 16:9. has a
    lot of features and offers manual opertion on light, iris, focus, etc. the
    lcd is a bit small but the viewfinder has great res and a great energy
    conformer with nearly 4.5 to 5.5 hours of filming with the supplied battery.
    we use it to produce TV programs and it works great. also, for weddings, my
    personal experience says that the clients like something that looks big,
    professional, like they want from a pro. 2 cents worth.

    drd
     
    doc, Feb 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Allan

    doc Guest

    i too don't recommend HDV yet cause in our opinion the format hasn't
    finalized yet and still in a lot of transition. SD is great in the DVX100A
    & B but the B is more pricey cause it's toooooo new yet.

    again, the dvc60 is great, a little bulky (large like the PD150) but our
    clients like the TV studio look over small and compact like they have
    themselves.

    drd
     
    doc, Feb 2, 2006
    #7
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