what's the best way to get more megapixels on nikon?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by mj_zheng, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. mj_zheng

    mj_zheng Guest

    I am using a D70 with 6megapixels. For what I do, I would like to be
    able to print without pixelation at as large format as possible. I
    bought mine when 6mp was the most i could get. But now I know there
    are cameras with more. My question is, is changing cameras the only
    way to get more pixels? It sounds awfully wasteful to me (I'm totally
    fine with the rest of D70.) Do they have a way of upgrading just the
    buffer capacity? Or other ways of upgrading from D70 without getting a
    new camera? Any info will be appreciated. Thanks.

    michael
     
    mj_zheng, Jan 10, 2007
    #1
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  2. mj_zheng

    Rudy Benner Guest

    You are talking about UPSAMPLING.

    If you are working from a raw file, you can get slightly better results by
    making this adjustment.
    The resultant file will be larger. Convert to 16 bit. Save to PSD or TIFF
    format, not JPEG.

    You would do well to get in the habit of using a tripod if you intend to
    enlarge your images.
    The tripod will help you get very sharp images. Get the IR remote.

    Auto focus is nice, but sometimes manual focus will work better.

    Good lenses help a lot.
     
    Rudy Benner, Jan 10, 2007
    #2
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  3. mj_zheng

    Scott W Guest

    One option is to stitch a number of photos together, there are programs
    that make this pretty easy and once you are stitching you can go to
    very high numbers of pixels.
    Here is a sample that I did
    http://www.pbase.com/konascott/image/72258285/large
    you can hit original at the bottom of the photo to see the full 39MP
    image.

    The program I use to do stitch is PTGui, but there are others out there
    as well.

    As far as upgrading you camera to more pixels, sorry that is just not
    in the cards.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Jan 10, 2007
    #3
  4. mj_zheng

    jeremy Guest

    The number of MP is dependent upon the chip, not a buffer. Either the chip
    has the pixels physically embodied or it doesn't.

    It is one of digital's little nuisances--you have to continually upgrade if
    you want to remain near the top of the technology curve--and the price your
    current camera will fetch will be only a fraction of what you paid for it.
     
    jeremy, Jan 10, 2007
    #4
  5. mj_zheng

    Rudy Benner Guest

    PTGui is excellent. It looks like the new CS3 will be very good as well.
    Also look for Autopano.

    Impressive picture Scott.
     
    Rudy Benner, Jan 10, 2007
    #5
  6. mj_zheng

    Mark² Guest

    How large is "large format" printing for you?
     
    Mark², Jan 10, 2007
    #6
  7. mj_zheng

    Mark² Guest

    The alternative it film...where it just stays limited to roughly the same
    capability.
    -But that's about like saying "from now on, all writing will be done with
    chalk, since pencils give an unfair advantage, due to finer and finer
    tip-point technology."
    :)
     
    Mark², Jan 10, 2007
    #7
  8. mj_zheng

    Toby Guest

    No way to get more pixels from your present camera. You can consider
    photoshop plugins like Genuine Fractals Print Pro or some that use s-spline
    technology, which will allow much larger prints without blocky pixelization.
    It will smooth the edges but will *not* give you better resolution.

    It's worth considering that pixel size in a print is a function of the
    square of the total number of pixels--so a 12 Mpix camera like the D2x only
    gives you a print about 1.4x the size of your 6 Mpix camera before you get
    the same amount of pixelization.

    Toby
     
    Toby, Jan 10, 2007
    #8
  9. mj_zheng

    mj_zheng Guest

    Thanks to all for your help. This is really helpful.

    I am an artist making instllations/performances mostly. So I have
    wanted to document my work and since they become the only things that I
    can show after the actual work is down, I have tried to make the
    photographs as large as the content demands. That of course depends on
    the piece. But in general, I find that I constantly need to get close
    to 20"x30" size, which I believe needs about 15~20MP to hold without
    too much pixelation. Sounds like none of the currently available
    cameras have that high a resolution. But if the CCD is the part that
    determines the pixels, then it seems to make sense to me for the
    manufacturers to make that part interchangable? No?

    But back to the point, given that we can just swap the chips, I do find
    Scott's suggestion very intriguing and perhaps the closest to a
    professional solution to a large and detailed photograph. It also
    sounds quite natural after he pointed it out. Dah! To try things
    out first, could anybody suggest a good quality public domain photo
    stitch program to start with?

    Thanks so much.

    michael

    p.s.,

    I just stumbled into making conceptual work with photographs lately and
    started to take lots of random shots. It warrents a really small
    pocket camera. And I was thinking in the same terms in that I was
    looking for super high resolution point-n-shoot, which invariably turn
    out to be with big cameras. But with this stitching alternative, I can
    really shop for small camera size now. Thanks indeed.
     
    mj_zheng, Jan 10, 2007
    #9
  10. mj_zheng

    Rudy Benner Guest

    Thanks to all for your help. This is really helpful.

    I am an artist making instllations/performances mostly. So I have
    wanted to document my work and since they become the only things that I
    can show after the actual work is down, I have tried to make the
    photographs as large as the content demands. That of course depends on
    the piece. But in general, I find that I constantly need to get close
    to 20"x30" size, which I believe needs about 15~20MP to hold without
    too much pixelation. Sounds like none of the currently available
    cameras have that high a resolution. But if the CCD is the part that
    determines the pixels, then it seems to make sense to me for the
    manufacturers to make that part interchangable? No?

    But back to the point, given that we can just swap the chips, I do find
    Scott's suggestion very intriguing and perhaps the closest to a
    professional solution to a large and detailed photograph. It also
    sounds quite natural after he pointed it out. Dah! To try things
    out first, could anybody suggest a good quality public domain photo
    stitch program to start with?

    http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~mbrown/autostitch/autostitch.html
     
    Rudy Benner, Jan 10, 2007
    #10
  11. mj_zheng

    mj_zheng Guest


    Great. I also checked out the other ones. Also, the new point-n-shoot
    canon I just got today came with its own photostitch program (it even
    has a 'stitch assist' mode!) Sounds like
    I'll be busy for a few days. Thanks for all the help.

    michael
     
    mj_zheng, Jan 11, 2007
    #11
  12. mj_zheng

    Bigguy Guest

    But in general, I find that I constantly need to get
    What you really need is a medium format digital camera/back not a '35mm'
    DSLR.

    Check the Mamiya (22Mp) and Hasselblad (22 or 39Mp) systems... there are
    others too.
    These do have removable backs/CCD blocks with the ability to upgrade to a
    higher resolution when they become available...

    http://www.mamiya.com/cameras.asp?id=1&id2=2127
    http://www.mamiya-op.co.jp/home/camera/eng/digital/zd/index.html
    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0409/04092902mamiya_zd.asp


    http://www.hasselblad.com/
    http://www.hasselblad.com/products/h-system.aspx
    http://www.hasselblad.com/products/backs.aspx
    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0609/06093003hasselbladh3d.asp

    You will require fairly deep pockets for these systems, BUT they do have an
    upgrade path, offer superb image quality and will use a variety of excellent
    lenses.

    Guy
     
    Bigguy, Jan 11, 2007
    #12
  13. mj_zheng

    tomm42 Guest

    Not an option, digital cameras are built around a chip, the only
    cameras to have removeable chips are the high end medium cameras and
    the Leica R8&R9. Look at $20,000-30,000 for a medium format camera,
    $10K for a leica setup with one lens. Too much is linked to the sensor,
    the image processor, software and basic design. Would cost more to
    switch out a processor than a new camera costs.
    If you are interested in the best photos you can get, get a good lens
    for your D70, a 17-55 f 2.8 Nikon or an 17-50 f2.8 Tamron (much less
    quality). If you dont mind single focal length lenses a 60mm f2.8
    micro, 35mm f2, or 50mm f1.4 Nikkors all would serve you well,
    especially if you are stitching (less distortion).
    Getting more pixels in your camera would also work, a D200 would give
    you 10mp, in large prints that makes a difference. Wouldn't be that
    difficult to get a 20x30 from a D200 file. Again good lenses make a big
    difference.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jan 11, 2007
    #13
  14. mj_zheng

    Scott W Guest

    If you are going to try stitching there is a free demo version of PTGui
    you can try.
    Also when shooting the photos it will work better if you get a fair bit
    back from the artwork and use a longer lens, a tripod would also help.
    You will also want to shoot in full manual mode to keep the exposures
    all the same. Make sure you give a fair bit of overlap between the
    images as this makes them easier to stitch.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Jan 11, 2007
    #14
  15. No. For example, if you have many (say 16+) shots of the
    same scene from the same point of view, you could try
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Lamenessing_Engine
    Be aware that this needs a _lot_ of computer time for larger
    images, and there is no nice "I don't have to think"-GUI.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jan 13, 2007
    #15
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