What's the difference between Nikon AF and Nikon AF-D

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Norm Dresner, Aug 19, 2005.

  1. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    There are a bunch of Nikkor 105mm Macro (Yeah, Nikon calls them "Micro")
    lenses out there which just say "AF" on the barrel and others which say
    "AF-D". What will a -D lens do that the AF won't?

    TIA
    Norm
     
    Norm Dresner, Aug 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Norm Dresner

    Matt Clara Guest

    D lens relays distance information to the camera to be used in calculating
    flash duration so as to ensure proper illumination of the subject.
     
    Matt Clara, Aug 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. Does anyone have a good explanation why that matters? In my mind, reflected
    light is reflected light. Whether it comes from a short or a long
    distance.

    Before Nikon came up with D lenses, distance information hardly ever came
    up in exposure computations (the only exception I know is macro
    photography).
     
    Philip Homburg, Aug 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Norm Dresner

    Matt Clara Guest

    Not really, but I do notice that Nikon will allow you to blow out objects
    close to the camera provided they aren't at the focus distance.
     
    Matt Clara, Aug 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    Well, I know it's used with some flash modes to have the camera set the
    aperture automatically based on the power and distance.

    Also, I vaguely remember reading that some cameras -- most notably the
    D50/D70 won't even attempt to do automatic exposure unless the lens is a "D"
    or "G" --- is this correct?

    Norm
     
    Norm Dresner, Aug 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Hmm, now that I think of it. Maybe that, when combining information from
    the AF system with the exposure data, knowing the focal length of the lens
    and the absolute distance helps in computing expected light fall of due to
    distance.

    However, a D1 plus an SB-28DX and of course a D lens (the only 'modern'
    combination I played with) doesn't seem more accurate than for example an
    FE2. And the D1 has the advantage of using pre-flashes to compute the
    proper exposure.
     
    Philip Homburg, Aug 19, 2005
    #6
  7. That is nothing magic. Based on a pre-flash the camera computes the
    required exposure and stops down the lens to an appropriate level.

    Without a pre-flash (typical TTL flash for film SLRs) only the
    flash duration can be used to control the power of the flash.
    A D100/D70/D50 needs a cpu-lens for automatic exposures. I doubt that a D
    lens would be required. But I don't know the details of the D70
    flash system.
     
    Philip Homburg, Aug 19, 2005
    #7
  8. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    Okay, I've finally found the Nikon D70 camera guide and here's what is says:

    Compatible Lenses
    Type G or D AF All functions supported
    Micro Nikkor 85mm All functions supported except autofocus and some
    exposure modes
    Other AF Nikkor All functions supported except 3D color matrix
    metering and iTTL balanced Fill-Flash for
    Digital SLR,
    AI-P All functions supported except 3D color matrix
    metering and iTTL balanced Fill-Flash for
    Digital SLR, and autofocus
    Non-CPU Can be used in mode M, but exposure meter does not
    function; electronic range finder can be used
    if
    maximum aperture is f/5.6 or faster

    SO ... I guess the Nikon 105 AF (non-D) would autofocus and could be used
    in the non-matrix metering exposure modes and couldn't be used for iTTL
    fill-flash with an SB-600 or SB-800

    Norm
     
    Norm Dresner, Aug 20, 2005
    #8
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