what's with the price of colour temp meters?

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by Noons, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. Noons

    Noons Guest

    sheesh, one would think that with dig, they'd have dropped
    in price. No way: as expen$ive as ever!
    :-(
     
    Noons, Aug 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. Noons

    LDR Guest


    cost of production x volume of sales = high price.
     
    LDR, Aug 29, 2006
    #2
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  3. Noons

    ColinD Guest

    Shouldn't that be cost of production / volume of sales = high price?

    Colin D
     
    ColinD, Aug 29, 2006
    #3
  4. Noons

    Noons Guest



    oops!... ¦-)
    Never mind, ldr: I got what you meant.
    Thing that gets me though is there is no middle of the road
    anywhere.

    Either it's a decrepit old thing with CDS cells for 50 bucks or so or
    a snazzy, super-dig Minolssen for 1400.

    Where the bloody hell is the mid ground marketing?
    Say: 200-300 bucks?

    Aw heck! Better start the saving...
     
    Noons, Aug 29, 2006
    #4
  5. Noons

    Noons Guest



    oops!... ¦-)
    Never mind, ldr: I got what you meant.
    Thing that gets me though is there is no middle of the road
    anywhere.

    Either it's a decrepit old thing with CDS cells for 50 bucks or so or
    a snazzy, super-dig Minolssen for 1400.

    Where the bloody hell is the mid ground marketing?
    Say: 200-300 bucks?

    Aw heck! Better start the saving...
     
    Noons, Aug 29, 2006
    #5
  6. Noons

    kosh Guest

    as there is less demnad... and hence less manufacturing... wich means
    rare... which means $$$$$$
     
    kosh, Aug 29, 2006
    #6
  7. Noons

    kosh Guest

    I have not looked deeply into this, but I would have thought a half way
    decent camera gives you than information when youtake a shot... possibly
    making the need for a colour meter redundant..... I would need to do
    some checking on this 'theory' however.

    kosh
     
    kosh, Aug 29, 2006
    #7
  8. Noons

    Noons Guest

    most good dslrs will let me adjust the white balance by
    specifying a colour temperature. But that's me adjusting,
    ie: they presume I *know* what it is to start with.
    Far from the reality.

    One would think that a good use for all that electronic
    power in these cameras would be to provide this kind of
    functionality. As you so well point out. Yet none can do
    this, AFAIK.

    (and before anyone jumps in with the usual "take a shot
    and check the monitor", no, you *cannot* judge white
    balance by looking at the image in a lcd monitor!)
     
    Noons, Aug 29, 2006
    #8
  9. Here's what I do: I shoot only raw with my DSLR. In at least one shot in
    each lighting situation I include a reliable grey reference in the shot.
    I use a set of WhiBal White Balance Reference Cards -- see
    http://www.rawworkflow.com/products/whibal/index.html

    When I do the raw conversion (with CaptureOne) I just click on the image
    of the grey card, and use that to set the white balance for all the
    shots in the set.

    This method is so simple and effective I wouldn't carry a colour
    temperature meter even if I had one.

    Peter Marquis-Kyle
     
    Peter Marquis-Kyle, Aug 29, 2006
    #9
  10. Noons

    kosh Guest

    hmmmm, you can't get the actual colour temp in degrees kelvin while
    reveiwing the shot? Or am I thinking of info you get from filebrowser in
    photoshop?

    kosh
     
    kosh, Aug 29, 2006
    #10
  11. Noons

    kosh Guest


    i like it!

    kosh
     
    kosh, Aug 29, 2006
    #11
  12. Noons

    Sandy Barrie Guest

    Hi,

    if you shoot in Raw, then you can use teh Adobe Raw plug in to tell you
    the colour tempratue.

    there is a little eye dropper that has a grey lower half. if you click
    that on any white object, the colour tempratuer will show up in "White
    Balance" As Shot temprature dialogure section to the right oftheImage
    window.

    Regards

    Sandy
     
    Sandy Barrie, Aug 29, 2006
    #12
  13. Noons

    Joan Guest

    I'm perplexed with this.

    If I take a photo at sunset of a person in a white shirt I want the
    shirt to have a golden colour, not white. I wouldn't adjust the
    colour temperature on import of the raw file to make the shirt white.

    I would have thought the grey card was for exposure, not colour
    temperature.

    --
    Joan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    : Noons wrote:
    : > most good dslrs will let me adjust the white balance by
    : > specifying a colour temperature. But that's me adjusting,
    : > ie: they presume I *know* what it is to start with.
    : > Far from the reality.
    : >
    : > One would think that a good use for all that electronic
    : > power in these cameras would be to provide this kind of
    : > functionality. As you so well point out. Yet none can do
    : > this, AFAIK.
    : >
    : > (and before anyone jumps in with the usual "take a shot
    : > and check the monitor", no, you *cannot* judge white
    : > balance by looking at the image in a lcd monitor!)
    :
    : Here's what I do: I shoot only raw with my DSLR. In at least one
    shot in
    : each lighting situation I include a reliable grey reference in the
    shot.
    : I use a set of WhiBal White Balance Reference Cards -- see
    : http://www.rawworkflow.com/products/whibal/index.html
    :
    : When I do the raw conversion (with CaptureOne) I just click on the
    image
    : of the grey card, and use that to set the white balance for all the
    : shots in the set.
    :
    : This method is so simple and effective I wouldn't carry a colour
    : temperature meter even if I had one.
    :
    : Peter Marquis-Kyle
     
    Joan, Aug 30, 2006
    #13
  14. Noons

    Noons Guest

    not that I know of how.
    Could well be something I'm doing wrong.
    The only thing I can eventually see is the kelvin used
    by the camera to process raw data for white balance.
    Different from what the scene actually had, which is
    what I was trying to get.
     
    Noons, Aug 30, 2006
    #14
  15. Noons

    Noons Guest



    Cool! Thanks.
     
    Noons, Aug 30, 2006
    #15
  16. Noons

    Noons Guest

    Not a bad way of getting around it. Thanks for the useful tip.
     
    Noons, Aug 30, 2006
    #16
  17. Noons

    werdan Guest

    The grey card also provides a reference point for white balance.

    Being 18% grey, it should be 18% grey, not 18% grey with a bit of yellow in
    it.
     
    werdan, Aug 30, 2006
    #17
  18. Noons

    Joan Guest

    What would happen if it were used for a sunset shot?

    --
    Joan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    :
    : : > I'm perplexed with this.
    : >
    : > If I take a photo at sunset of a person in a white shirt I want
    the
    : > shirt to have a golden colour, not white. I wouldn't adjust the
    : > colour temperature on import of the raw file to make the shirt
    white.
    : >
    : > I would have thought the grey card was for exposure, not colour
    : > temperature.
    : >
    :
    : The grey card also provides a reference point for white balance.
    :
    : Being 18% grey, it should be 18% grey, not 18% grey with a bit of
    yellow in
    : it.
    :
    :
     
    Joan, Aug 30, 2006
    #18
  19. Noons

    werdan Guest

    If you were taking sunset shot and the camera was on auto white balance, it
    would try to make the whole scene neutral or less 'golden' by adding more
    blue. If you had a grey card in the shot, it would have a bluish tinge to it
    (red+green=yellow, +blue=white).

    When processing the RAW file later, you could set the grey card area as your
    neutral reference point which would removed the excess blue from the pic.
    This would then give you the true 'golden' glow. You could then use the same
    colour settings for any other pics you took that that time.
     
    werdan, Aug 30, 2006
    #19
  20. The catch is "any white object" may not really white, or there may be
    none in shot. A proper grey target (like the WhiBal one) is a more
    reliable source for setting white balance.

    -Michael
     
    Michael Strasser, Aug 30, 2006
    #20
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