When will Kodak announced a new film format to compete against 35mm and APS

Discussion in 'Kodak' started by esrabb, Jun 29, 2005.

  1. esrabb

    no_name Guest

    Sombody was working on that a couple of years back; Silicon film or
    something like that. Shaped like a 35mm cartridge with a tab that stuck
    out like the film behind the shutter.

    Their original plan was to offer it for the top tier Nikon & Canon film
    cameras, and maybe versions to fit other cameras later.

    Never made it to market.

    http://www.dpreview.com/news/9909/99090501siliconfilm.asp

    http://www.sitmark.com/Portfolio/SiliconFilmOverview.pdf
     
    no_name, Oct 5, 2005
    #21
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  2. esrabb

    Robert C. Guest

    Too bad it never made it to market; it looked like a very potential product.
     
    Robert C., Oct 5, 2005
    #22
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  3. esrabb

    no_name Guest

    Yeah, I thought so, but evidently they were behind the power curve all
    the way.

    AFAIK, they never progressed beyond a 4MP sensor, and it only managed
    64MB of storage. And what did them in was the cheap point 'n shoot
    digital, not the DSLR.

    The price point wasn't low enough, the technology wan't good enough, it
    wasn't universal enough; working only with higher end Nikon & Canon,
    they missed their market, not just timing, but who would actually want
    the product. They aimed it at Professionals & Prosumers, when their
    natural market was the "pictures as memories ... 35mm SLR" crowd.

    Photographers who could afford high end Nikon & Canon film SLRs, the
    Professionals & Prosumers, could afford the jump to the DSLR. And
    demanded better technology than the SiliconFilm offered.

    It's the rest of the 35mm SLR owners who ended up buying point 'n shoot
    digitals (why so much good quality consumer grade SLR gear keeps getting
    dumped on ebay).

    If they'd got the price down, made it universally adaptable (i.e. it'd
    work in ANY 35mm SLR) and solved the problem of limited storage (and the
    kludgey interface for transferring images to the computer), it'd have
    been a viable product.
     
    no_name, Oct 5, 2005
    #23
  4. esrabb

    Robert C. Guest

    When reading the article, these were my thoughts as to why it was doomed to
    fail. They had a good product, but missed the possibilities by limiting the
    storage size, the interface type, and the camera types that the "cartridge"
    was useable in. A little bit of better R&D, as well as better marketing and
    this product may have sold.
     
    Robert C., Oct 6, 2005
    #24
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