Where can I find USB cables with superior shielding and ferrite chokes?

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by rogacasa, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. rogacasa

    rogacasa Guest

    Hi. For my SCSI and Firewire cables, I use Granite Digital cables
    exclusively. Does anyone know where I can find similarly high-quality
    USB cables? Ones with good shielding and ferrite chokes?

    Thanks,
    Roger Carlson
     
    rogacasa, Jan 24, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. rogacasa

    kegewe Guest

    Kenneth Weinberger
    1.
    Jan 24, 9:58 am hide options

    Newsgroups: rec.video.desktop, rec.video.production, comp.periphs.scsi
    From: - Find messages by this author
    Date: 24 Jan 2006 06:58:01 -0800
    Local: Tues, Jan 24 2006 9:58 am
    Subject: Where can I find USB cables with superior shielding and
    ferrite chokes?
    Reply | Reply to Author | Forward | Print | Individual Message | Show
    original | Report Abuse

    Kenneth Weinberger

    Hi. For my SCSI and Firewire cables, I use Granite Digital cables
    exclusively. Does anyone know where I can find similarly high-quality
    USB cables? Ones with good shielding and ferrite chokes?


    Thanks,
    Roger Carlson
     
    kegewe, Jan 25, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. rogacasa

    Doz Guest

    one begs to ask... why ?
     
    Doz, Jan 26, 2006
    #3
  4. rogacasa

    Rick S. Guest

    Good question.

    The reason Roger can't find USB cables with ferrite chokes
    is because they aren't needed. With most kinds of serial
    communication you'd have to have an insane amount of
    interference to cause a problem. A USB cable is just two
    data lines and two grounds.
     
    Rick S., Jan 26, 2006
    #4
  5. rogacasa

    Jukka Aho Guest

    I've seen a USB cable that's as described - with a thick, sturdy lead
    and ferrite chokes. Came with the Sony DSC-F717 digital camera. (Haven't
    been shopping for USB cables for a while so I don't know what kind of
    cables they generally have available.)
     
    Jukka Aho, Jan 26, 2006
    #5
  6. I have sitting right here next to my keyboard one USB cable
    with molded-in ferrite chokes on each end, and two more which
    came from the manufacturer with the "snap-on" kind on each end.
    If anything, serial forms of communication (like USB and Firewire
    and SATA) create MORE potential for interference as their
    data/clock rates are 8~16x what they would be if they were
    parallel connections. OTOH, they are all shielded, also.

    I believe Roger's question wasn't about the *general*
    availability of USB cables with ferrite chokes, but rather the
    availability of *premium* (magical, snake-oil, boutique, name-
    brand) USB cables with ferrite chokes. You can tell from my
    obvious prejudice that I have no faith in premium cables and
    I would not pay a penny extra for them.

    I must admit that I have removed the snap-on ferrite chokes
    from most of the cables I use, and with no discernable down-
    side. Now if I were having an RFI problem, that would be
    one thing, but getting government regulatory approval is a
    hoop that manufacturers must jump through whether they
    actually make any sense in the real-world or not.
     
    Richard Crowley, Jan 26, 2006
    #6
  7. rogacasa

    Rick S. Guest

    And I bet those cables are thin, unshielded or both.
     
    Rick S., Jan 26, 2006
    #7
  8. "Rick S." wrote...
    Actually, not. Thin does not imply unshielded. I'm pretty sure the
    USB standards require shielded wire. It is easy enough to look up.
     
    Richard Crowley, Jan 26, 2006
    #8
  9. rogacasa

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Choke has to do with high frequency signals, regardless of the shield.
     
    Rick Merrill, Jan 26, 2006
    #9
  10. rogacasa

    Sunny Guest

    My M$ mouse, Garmin GPS, and Nikon camera all have ferrite chokes on
    their USB cables.

    I was a bit disappointed when my OBDII interface cable arrived sans
    choke - I would have thought a running vehicle would be a more hostile
    environment than anywhere you'd typically use the devices which were
    supplied with chokes.

    Sunny
     
    Sunny, Jan 27, 2006
    #10
  11. Never heard of the Faraday cage, I guess.
     
    Folkert Rienstra, Jan 27, 2006
    #11
  12. rogacasa

    Sunny Guest

    I have, but wasn't aware an automobile behaved approximately like one
    until now. Cool.

    Sunny
     
    Sunny, Jan 27, 2006
    #12
  13. rogacasa

    PeterD Guest

    Yea, right... As almost always, Folkert once again proves the bluff
    and blunder is the only thing he is good at. And, yes, Folkert, I *am*
    and electrical engineer, and there is *NO* way that a car could be
    considered a faraday cage. None.

    And...

    The reason for the ferrite chokes on cables is not to prevent the
    cable from picking up interference--it is there to prevent the cable
    from radiating interference to other devices.


    (Folkert's answers that are right vs. total bs and running down
    everyone else is currently at 4.9% right.)
     
    PeterD, Jan 27, 2006
    #13
  14. That is a remarkably broad-brush and reckless statement for a
    self-proclaimed "electrical engineer". If that were the case we
    wouldn't need external antennas for car radios, etc.
     
    Richard Crowley, Jan 27, 2006
    #14
  15. rogacasa

    Eric Gisin Guest

    Portable FM radio works fine in a car at head level.
    There is too much glass to block EM waves.

    Yes, the shielding is there to prevent RF emissions.
    I have no idea why a USB cable would have a choke too.
     
    Eric Gisin, Jan 27, 2006
    #15
  16. It was proven again when Richard Hammond of Top Gear put
    a car under a High Tension supply line and they drew an arc
    of several meters long for half a minute with him sitting in it.

    He drove it away after that, fully functional.
    Both of them, him and the car.
     
    Folkert Rienstra, Jan 27, 2006
    #16
  17. rogacasa

    PeterD Guest

    Ah, another engineer... <g> Nope, the reasons are bit more complex
    than that. I've used many a radio in a car with out an external
    antenna... They don't work well (the car's parts do attenuate the
    signal at certain positions.
     
    PeterD, Jan 27, 2006
    #17
  18. rogacasa

    PeterD Guest

    Geeze, Rienstra, get serious. That's the biggest pile of horse pucky
    I've seen you write in months. Birds sit on power lines all the time,
    and they don't get electrocuted--so a power line is a faraday shield
    too?

    To have voltage flow you need to have both ends of the
    circuit--Hammond of Top Gear (whoever that is) didn't have that.

    Get your mommy to take you to a science museum some day, where they
    have the platform on glass and a high voltage generator. Best when you
    have long hair, quite an experience. I'm sure your folks will take
    you.
     
    PeterD, Jan 27, 2006
    #18
  19. Why do I always get the impression that a person that says this is sit-
    ting in front of a mirror, preparing a troll, using himself for inspiration.
    I am, which obviously can't be said of you, although with your limited
    abilities you probably think you are.
    Have I told you before that you can't read?
    Yep. Any idea what an arc is PeterD(umb)?
    (What you can't get the Beeb where you live? You in Hillbilly land?)

    Gosh, maybe that is why he lived to tell. Novel eh.
    That's the whole point of a Faraday cage, stupid.
    For someone with your obviously limited abilities it probably is.
    For me that is like taking a comb through my hair. Wow, what a thrill.

    And you know what. That comb may kill an electronic circuit perfectly.
    That may be a bit of a tall order. You Jesus, by any chance?
     
    Folkert Rienstra, Jan 28, 2006
    #19
  20. rogacasa

    PeterD Guest

    Good try at a comeback for a TROLL... My troll-o-meter just dropped
    you down by a percentage point...

    Plonk.
     
    PeterD, Jan 28, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.