Which Nikon should I buy?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by jsl, Sep 3, 2003.

  1. jsl

    jsl Guest

    I am trying to figure out which Nikon to purchase - namely the F100 or
    the N90. The N90 is clearly the least expensive, so that's always
    good, but I am most concerned with the outcome of the shots. I
    realize it's in the choice of lens, but I still need to purchase a
    camera! (if you can suggest another nikon please do).

    I want the quality that Leica offers, but I have not ever used a
    rangefinder and am nervous I won't meld to this way of shooting. I
    have been studying the Leica R series too. I stray from this because
    it seems to me that shooting SLR diminishes the quality, so for the
    price of things the Nikon is the wiser choice.

    The question for me with the Nikon isn't about bells and whistles in
    and of itself, but about functionality and weight.

    Another topic/question: How does a person using a Leica know what
    exposure to be set at? When I shoot with my medium format vintage
    camera I use a light meter, but you don't always have time for that
    and in documentary work it seems a light meter would be awfully
    intrustive and disruptive.

    jsl
     
    jsl, Sep 3, 2003
    #1
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  2. jsl

    Frank Pittel Guest

    : I am trying to figure out which Nikon to purchase - namely the F100 or
    : the N90. The N90 is clearly the least expensive, so that's always
    : good, but I am most concerned with the outcome of the shots. I
    : realize it's in the choice of lens, but I still need to purchase a
    : camera! (if you can suggest another nikon please do).

    : I want the quality that Leica offers, but I have not ever used a
    : rangefinder and am nervous I won't meld to this way of shooting. I
    : have been studying the Leica R series too. I stray from this because
    : it seems to me that shooting SLR diminishes the quality, so for the
    : price of things the Nikon is the wiser choice.

    : The question for me with the Nikon isn't about bells and whistles in
    : and of itself, but about functionality and weight.

    : Another topic/question: How does a person using a Leica know what
    : exposure to be set at? When I shoot with my medium format vintage
    : camera I use a light meter, but you don't always have time for that
    : and in documentary work it seems a light meter would be awfully
    : intrustive and disruptive.

    There's one person here that has made it clear that he guesses at the
    exposure.
    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Sep 3, 2003
    #2
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  3. jsl

    Gordon Moat Guest

    You should be able to get either one used, and probably good condition,
    of you shop carefully. Have you looked into an FM3A? Strange alternative,
    but much more compact camera.
    An easy way to see if rangefinder photography fits the way you want to do
    photos, is to get one of the older low cost 1970s rangefinder cameras
    with fixed lens. The Yashica, Canon, Konica, Olympus, Petri, and Minolta
    choices of that era offer a wide array of options, some as low as $10 in
    working condition.

    Leica R is another story. Some were more like Minolta SLRs of the same
    time, while the newer offerings are quite expensive. If you consider
    those, check out the Contax SLR choices for comparison.
    It may be important to consider what functions you will really use on a
    camera. Nikon offers a large system of choices, and there are many rental
    items available in larger cities. However, if you can work with less
    gear, you may find more freedom in doing photography. Sometimes the more
    you carry, the less it gets used.
    Similar to a Nikon FM, there are LEDs in the viewfinder to show exposure.
    When you turn the aperture and shutter on a Leica M6 or M6TTL, the LEDs
    will indicate exposure. With the new M7, there is an aperture priority
    setting, meaning you would only need to alter the aperture setting, and
    the camera will choose the shutter speed. On the M7, there is a display
    in the viewfinder to indicate settings.

    The M6 is at a relative bargain price currently. With the later TTL
    version, the shutter speed dial is larger, and slightly easier to turn.
    The newer M7 also has this larger shutter speed dial. On the old M2, M3,
    or any of the M4 choices, there is no in camera meter.
    It depends upon how much the light is changing. Often you can do one
    reading every 10 to 15 minutes and be fine, or just take several readings
    at different spots, and remember the settings. However, I would urge you
    to consider an M6, or M6 TTL, rather than the older Leica choices.

    Finally, the F100 has a wealth of flash photography options. If you think
    you may make use of some of those features, it may be worth getting one.
    With any of your choices, try to handle the camera, and see if the
    controls and ergonomics fit the way you want to do photography.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    Alliance Graphique Studio
    <http://www.allgstudio.com>
     
    Gordon Moat, Sep 3, 2003
    #3
  4. Primary argument against the N90 is that VR lenses will not utilize the VR
    feature when mounted to the N90. As yet, Nikon only has 3 such lenses in
    production, or announced, but more may follow. And I've found Canon's
    version (IS) to be indispensable at times. Give the F100 some serious
    thought, in the long run it may be less expensive to but it rather than buy
    the N90, and later the F100 when you decide you want VR lenses.
     
    Skip Middleton, Sep 3, 2003
    #4
  5. jsl

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Tony Spadaro, Sep 3, 2003
    #5
  6. jsl

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    I would go with the 100. The N90 is an old model at this point and since
    this could well be your last film camera you might want to get as modern a
    model as possible. The F100 takes more lenses and has a more advanced meter.
    There are many other improvements to boot.

    --
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
    home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
    The Improved Links Pages are at
    http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
    New email - Contact on the Menyou page.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Sep 3, 2003
    #6
  7. There are many photographers who use both the SLR and a Leica M
    camera. They involved different styles of operation.
    Not true. Almost all of Leica's SLR lenses have been recomputed in
    recent years, and the oldest design is the 80mm 1.4, I believe, from
    about 1982, other than the 50mm Summicron-R from 1976, which remains
    the best 50mm f/2 available. The most recent, the 90mm Apo-Summicron
    ASPH, combines an aspeherical surface with apochromatic correction.
    Several other lenses in the Leica SLR range are state of the art, and
    are diffraction-limited. They offer a 180mm Summicon (f/2) that is
    unbelieveable. The new 180mm Elmarit (f/2.8) is apochromatically
    corrected. There's no way that shooting Leica SLR gives you less
    quality than shooting Leica rangefinder.

    The new 50mm 1.4 is only about 5 years old, and new versions of 28mm,
    19mm, and 90mm lenses have been brought out in recent years, and
    needless to say, out-perform anything Nikon offer.
    The M6, M7, and MP all have TTL metering. M2, M3, and M-4 had a
    clip-on meter.
    The exposure does not need to be changed unless the light level or
    angle changes significantly. Most good reportage photographers know
    the exposures for their favourite films by heart anyway.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Sep 3, 2003
    #7
  8. I dislike the N90's VF (it, and the N70, are unusual for
    Nikon in that the finder is not very sharp - making manual
    focus more difficult). Nikon's VF's tend to be sharper and
    easier to see than those of most other brands, so I would not
    disgard this useful feature... Look also at the excellent 8008
    (smaller and lighter, but the AF is not as good). If MF is OK,
    the FM2, FE2, FM3, FA, and F3 can be good choices - and
    even the old N2000 and FG can serve well enough for most
    purposes (which is not to mention a good-condition F or
    F2 - or F4 or F5, or even an N6000...;-). Nikon made a lot
    of good bodies...
    (As other posters pointed out, though, using VR or G lenses
    does limit the choices.)
    See other posters' comments on this - to which I will add: Leica
    image-quality, until recently, has been more hype than reality - but
    with current (horribly-expensive) aspheric lenses, the reality is
    finally catching up with the hype...;-) I find rfdr-use OK if I have
    the time to use it - but then good, sharp GG SLR focus is
    also OK, and easier for me (and it provides a better preview
    of the image, with superior framing-accuracy). The AF in the F100
    is good enough that I now trust it (unlike with earlier cameras).
    No-one I know dislikes the F100 when first picked up - and
    it is only the second 35mm camera that I immediately liked on first try
    (the other was the original Nikon F...;-).
    They have built-in meters now...;-)
    But, with an F100 set in an auto-exposure mode (biasable...),
    with AF, you will shoot rings around a Leica rfdr (unless you
    don't care about exact focus and exposure and preset these...;-).
    A good SLR is just plain more versatile...
     
    David Ruether, Sep 3, 2003
    #8
  9. jsl

    BG250 Guest

    Go F100 because the N90 is being made obsolete by Nikon's newer technology
    lenses. If your sure you won't get a new lens any time soon, the N90 is a
    good choice if you can find a good deal on one. If money is not an issue I
    would definitely go F100.
    bg
     
    BG250, Sep 3, 2003
    #9
  10. jsl

    Alan Browne Guest

    Ooops. I was looking at the F4 when I wrote that.
     
    Alan Browne, Sep 3, 2003
    #10
  11. jsl

    T P Guest


    Buy the Canon EOS 300D instead!

    But if you must buy a Nikon 35mm SLR, stick to the F100, over which
    the N90s has no advantages. I assume you meant the N90s - because the
    earlier N90 is so inferior that it should not really be included in
    the same sentence as the F100.
     
    T P, Sep 4, 2003
    #11
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