Who here has inherited negatives.

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Scott W, Aug 17, 2008.

  1. Scott W

    Scott W Guest

    And of the people who have inherited negatives how many prints from
    the negatives have you made?

    I will start off, my dad gave me his B/W negatives from when he was
    taking a lot of photos from the 50s, I have scanned a small fraction
    of them and made even less prints. The negatives are in pretty bad
    shape, needing a lot of cleaning before then can be scanned and even
    then the images need a fair bit of clean up in PS.

    I heard some people saying that a good thing about film is that the
    negatives will last a long time, but I rarely see negatives from
    relatives that have past on. The prints are found, but for the most
    part the negatives are just not to be found.

    Second part of the discussion, lets say you do keep your negatives in
    good condition and in a place where they can be found, will your
    descendents bother to try and make prints from them? If I did not
    have a film scanner there is little chance that I would have bothered
    making any prints from my dads negatives. There is no place that I
    can drive to where I can get B/W film printed, I doubt that I would
    ever get around to mailing them out to get printed.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Aug 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Scott W

    tony cooper Guest

    I'm not in your position since I don't have old b&w negs to scan, but
    I'm scanning in all of the family slides and prints and putting them
    on to disk. I've done the slides, and I'm part-way through the
    prints.

    My reasoning is that 1) I don't want to divide the photos among my
    children, and 2) people just don't go through prints anymore. I'm
    even taking prints out of albums and scanning them. Viewing images
    on-screen is the only way people seem to view family shots now days.

    One set of DVD disks to each child, two sets to the safety deposit
    box, and one set kept with me. Also stored on an external hard drive.
    I dunno what the format of the future will be, but I'm preparing the
    best way currently available.
     
    tony cooper, Aug 17, 2008
    #2
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  3. Scott W

    frank Guest

    Buy archival sleeves for them.

    You might want to find a friend who has a darkroom to do contact
    prints of all the negatives, then archive the prints, use a 2 step
    fix, everything to archive the prints. though B&W is pretty hardy.

    Put the negatives in binders with the prints. Let the family know of
    them, or sometimes historical societies are looking for stuff like
    this. Or universities, you'd be amazed.
     
    frank, Aug 18, 2008
    #3
  4. Good suggestion.
    I agree that making "wet" contacts of the negatives would be 1) easier
    than and 2) more useful than scanning them (since you say you don't have
    a film scanner). Assuming you have someplace set up for a darkroom
    (could be a bathroom or a closet), it's pretty simple and doesn't
    require any equipment apart from a piece of glass and some trays to
    develop & fix. If you know someone who processes B&W, it would be very
    simple for them. Or maybe you have a local school or a photo store that
    rents darkroom space (there still are a few here and there).

    If you make contacts, that makes it easier to see which frames you
    actually might want to make full-size wet prints from (or have scanned),
    rather than scanning everything and then separating the wheat from the
    chaff.


    --
    "In 1964 Barry Goldwater declared: 'Elect me president, and I
    will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
    population into concentration camps and turn the country into a
    wasteland.' But Lyndon Johnson said: 'No! No! No! Don't you dare do
    that. Let ME do it.'"

    - Characterization (paraphrased) of the 1964 Goldwater/Johnson
    presidential race by Professor Irwin Corey, "The World's Foremost
    Authority".
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 18, 2008
    #4
  5. Scott W

    Scott W Guest

    Finding a person that has a working darkroom is not very likely. and
    most of the work getting them scanned is in the cleaning, so I all I
    wanted was index prints and did not care about the dirt I could do
    that with less trouble.

    The point is that I am better equipped to deal with the negatives then
    most people would be and even with that they are a pain to work with.
    In 50 years how many people are going to still own working negatives
    scanners? Any who is going to have working darkrooms. Even schools
    are closing their darkrooms, in 50 years I believe it is going to be
    very hard to find a darkroom, or film scanner.

    But the reason for the question in my original post was to see if
    people really are getting a hold of their relative’s negatives, and if
    so are they making any new prints from them. The theory seems to be
    that negatives will be past on from generation to generation, but I
    just don’t seem much of this happening. I have my dad’s negatives,
    but no negatives from any of my grandparents or great grand parents.
    My parents have no idea what happened to the negatives their own
    parents must have had at one time.

    Prints seem to survive from one generation to the next, but for the
    most part negatives don’t.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Aug 18, 2008
    #5
  6. Scott W

    Annika1980 Guest

    My mom has shelves full of big fat photo albums stuffed with photos
    from the past 70 years or so. She even has entire envelopes of photos
    taped onto some of the pages. Not a negative to be found. I asked
    her what happened to the negatives and she said she probably just
    threw them away. "I have the photos so why do I need to keep the
    negatives?" she asked.

    I only have a very few old slides from my grandfather's extensive
    world travels. The rest of them were lost or thrown away after he
    died. What a waste!

    One old guy I know has about 30,000 slides dating back to the 40's.
    I've scanned a few of them for him and made prints from them, but I'd
    hate to tackle the whole catalog.
     
    Annika1980, Aug 18, 2008
    #6
  7. Scott W

    Bruce Guest


    Perhaps it has escaped you that black and white film sales are growing
    rapidly?

    The death of film has been announced many times. But it hasn't
    happened yet, and is unlikely to happen for several decades.
     
    Bruce, Aug 18, 2008
    #7
  8. Scott W

    Noons Guest

    Bruce wrote,on my timestamp of 18/08/2008 7:58 PM:
    I find it amazing how pushers of a technology scarcely 10
    years old and already radically changed twice, are so
    qualified to predict what will happen in the next 50 years
    to a technology that has existed for 100.
    Reeks of something, but I won't say it...
     
    Noons, Aug 18, 2008
    #8
  9. We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
    drugs began to take hold. I remember "Frank ess" <>
    saying something like:

    Excellent. Thanks.
     
    Grimly Curmudgeon, Aug 18, 2008
    #9
  10. Scott W

    Noons Guest

    [email protected] wrote,on my timestamp of 18/08/2008 11:35 PM:
    Actually, that one I could go with! I like the concept
    of not having to carry around books. Unfortunately like
    you said, the alternative is still far from practical.

    The paperless office comes to mind as well...
     
    Noons, Aug 18, 2008
    #10
  11. Scott W

    Ken Hart1 Guest

    And we all know that ever since television became popular, all movie
    theaters have shut down for lack of business. And there are no AM radio
    stations on the air anymore ever since FM radios took over the marketplace.
    And does anyone remember newspapers? We used to have them until TV newcasts
    made them all worthless.
    Of course, film's days are numbered- it won't be long before the last roll
    of film is gone- when they can pry it from my cold, dead, fixer stained
    fingers!
     
    Ken Hart1, Aug 19, 2008
    #11
  12. Scott W

    Scott W Guest

    So, finding people who have home darkrooms is as easy as it every
    was? And in 50 years there will be no decrease in the number of
    people with darkrooms?, very interesting indeed.

    But what about the main topic of the thread, have any of you got
    negatives from parents, grandparent’s etc. And if you have the
    negatives have you made prints from their negatives?

    I do have a shoebox (a real shoe box no less), of my dad’s negatives,
    and I have made a couple of prints. What I find is that there is a
    big difference between the theory about making prints from old
    negatives and the reality of it. First off most of the time the
    negatives are nowhere to be found. But even if you do have them
    getting prints from them is not so easy.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Aug 19, 2008
    #12
  13. No, it's not as easy as it used to be. So tell us: where are you? Is
    there a school near you that still has a real (i.e., wet) photography
    program? A photo store that has a rental darkroom? (I have both near me,
    in Oakland/Berkeley.) How about posting something on Craigslist? There
    may be some old-schoolers in your area with darkrooms who'd be willing
    to help you.

    You should at least try to have some contact prints made, to see if the
    negatives are worth printing. Since these are family photos, they
    probably are worthwhile.


    --
    "In 1964 Barry Goldwater declared: 'Elect me president, and I
    will bomb the cities of Vietnam, defoliate the jungles, herd the
    population into concentration camps and turn the country into a
    wasteland.' But Lyndon Johnson said: 'No! No! No! Don't you dare do
    that. Let ME do it.'"

    - Characterization (paraphrased) of the 1964 Goldwater/Johnson
    presidential race by Professor Irwin Corey, "The World's Foremost
    Authority".
     
    David Nebenzahl, Aug 19, 2008
    #13
  14. Scott W

    Bruce Guest


    Of course there is a decrease. Most people are lazy and digital
    provides an easy alternative.

    But you and others claim that a decrease in the number of darkrooms
    means that film is dead. It means nothing of the sort! All it means
    is that less people have a darkroom, not that no-one has one.

    It is also the case that many film users are scanning film,
    manipulating it in Photoshop and printing it on inkjet printers. In
    the case of black and white, using film and scanning it is a far, far
    better method than converting a full colour image from a Bayer pattern
    sensor. No darkroom needed, but film is still alive and well.

    Sales of colour film have dropped, but sales of black and white film
    are growing strongly. Film isn't dead, not by a long way.
     
    Bruce, Aug 19, 2008
    #14
  15. A couple friends of mine have been forced to move, the old house is unsafe.
    They left behind a LOT of negatives, slides, etc. This pains me, as they are
    impossible to reproduce. They chose instead to move books, and things like
    that which are currently for sale.

    Sometimes I don't understand people.

    I have no inherited negatives, but my Dad did. As it happens, my Dad does
    black and white devloping in the cellar. Not sure what to say about getting
    prints made. Check with the local photo stores in your area.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    And of the people who have inherited negatives how many prints from
    the negatives have you made?

    I will start off, my dad gave me his B/W negatives from when he was
    taking a lot of photos from the 50s, I have scanned a small fraction
    of them and made even less prints. The negatives are in pretty bad
    shape, needing a lot of cleaning before then can be scanned and even
    then the images need a fair bit of clean up in PS.

    I heard some people saying that a good thing about film is that the
    negatives will last a long time, but I rarely see negatives from
    relatives that have past on. The prints are found, but for the most
    part the negatives are just not to be found.

    Second part of the discussion, lets say you do keep your negatives in
    good condition and in a place where they can be found, will your
    descendents bother to try and make prints from them? If I did not
    have a film scanner there is little chance that I would have bothered
    making any prints from my dads negatives. There is no place that I
    can drive to where I can get B/W film printed, I doubt that I would
    ever get around to mailing them out to get printed.

    Scott
     
    Stormin Mormon, Sep 12, 2008
    #15
  16. And technology is changing so rapidly. Reel tapes, punch cards, floppys in 5
    1/4, 8, and then 3 1/2. And the changes keep happening.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..



    One set of DVD disks to each child, two sets to the safety deposit
    box, and one set kept with me. Also stored on an external hard drive.
    I dunno what the format of the future will be, but I'm preparing the
    best way currently available.
     
    Stormin Mormon, Sep 12, 2008
    #16
  17. Scott W

    Annika1980 Guest

    I have a Kodachrome slide of my parents taken the year before I was
    born. It looks like it was taken yesterday. I managed to clone out
    my mom and then I photoshopped a pic of myself into standing right
    beside my dad. It's kinda weird since I'm older than my dad in the
    pic.
    Oh well, he thought it was cool.
     
    Annika1980, Oct 6, 2008
    #17
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