Who was thinking about switching to a Mac?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Brian Baird, Feb 25, 2005.

  1. You should stop reading reviews and check out the real world. OS X is
    far more stable than any version of Windows.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Feb 26, 2005
    #21
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  2. And he has a clear case of Clue Deficit Disorder.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Feb 26, 2005
    #22
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  3. XP - stable? Windows 2000 was a much better product and far less ugly.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Feb 26, 2005
    #23
  4. And if frogs had wings they wouldn't hit their ass every time they
    jumped.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Feb 26, 2005
    #24
  5. Exactly the same as a Mac. Of course, you can set it up so it doesn't
    need a password to operate or look at the data, but even then, you will
    need one to modify the operating system. If you take advantage of the
    default mode, which requires a password to operate the computer, no one
    can access ANY of your data.

    Merritt
     
    Merritt Mullen, Feb 26, 2005
    #25
  6. "Some version of UNIX" IS the Mac OS. And there is a God.

    Merritt
     
    Merritt Mullen, Feb 26, 2005
    #26
  7. Brian Baird

    Lisa Horton Guest

    Stunning, perhaps, but not in a good way. Programs run, but Classic
    mode lacks some capabilities of Classic OS. Network printing can be
    iffy, or worse.

    On hardware, Apple's level of legacy support is laughable compared to
    the Wintel world. You may be able to run a program from a doorstop Mac,
    but you can't use the keyboard from it. But with a trivially
    inexpensive adaptor you can use the keyboard from a PC of the same era
    on a brand new PC today. Only now are "legacy" ISA slots starting to
    disapear from PCs.

    Lisa
     
    Lisa Horton, Feb 26, 2005
    #27
  8. Randall Ainsworth wrote:
    []
    In my experience both Windows XP and Windows 2000 are suitable to 24 x 7
    running without crashes or memory leaks.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Feb 26, 2005
    #28
  9. Brian Baird

    Guest Guest

    of course it lacks some capabilities than when booting os 9 natively.
    however, the sheer majority of apps and even things which directly
    modified os 9's behaviour work without a problem. but there will be a
    few that will have some issues.

    how many windows 3.1 apps can still run in xp without any problem
    whatsoever?

    just like everything else, macs are not without problems. the
    transition from os 9 to os x was a huge change and it was relatively
    smooth. unfortunately, there were a few bumps along the way and some
    things did get left behind. a lot of effort was put into maintaining
    compatibility where possible, but sometimes the cord must be cut as
    technology progresses.
     
    Guest, Feb 26, 2005
    #29
  10. Brian Baird

    C J Campbell Guest

    So why don't salespeople know about it and why doesn't even Apple mention it
    on their web site? Is the existence of this feature some sort of national
    secret?
     
    C J Campbell, Feb 26, 2005
    #30
  11. Brian Baird

    Charles Guest

    They do mention it on their web site. Apparently you are either not
    literate, or have your own agenda of spouting misinformation or
    both......
     
    Charles, Feb 26, 2005
    #31
  12. Brian Baird

    Lisa Horton Guest

    Typical of a Mac apologist, snipping out the description of the
    incomplete parts of Classic Mode. Sure, the sheer majority of apps
    work, as long as your printing situation is simple and doesn't involve
    certain kinds of network printers. Yup, it's all great, until you need
    to print.
    How about a more appropriate comparison, like Win 95 programs under XP?
    Certain cords anyway, like serial ports. I have a printer I bought in
    96, it still works great and I like it a lot. I haven't been able to
    use it on a new Mac in years, as it uses serial to talk to Macs. But I
    can still use it on virtually any new PC, as they still have the legacy
    support parallel ports.

    The Mac has a lot of good points and strengths, legacy support just
    isn't one of them.

    Lisa
     
    Lisa Horton, Feb 26, 2005
    #32
  13. Brian Baird

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    That may be a function of what applications are in use. I have
    fewer problems with Windows 2000 -- but I use it very little -- just
    for things for which I cannot (yet) get unix programs. (Examples are the
    annual income tax software, and (until recently) processing RAW images
    from the Nikon D70 (to get us back on topic slightly).

    And I do *not* allow a Windows system to handle e-mail or to
    contact the outside world.

    Most of what I do uses either Sun's Solaris (in various
    versions), or OpenBSD. And *those* I find suitable for 24/7 operation.

    ======================================================================
    izalco up 9+05:31, 3 users, load 0.07, 0.10, 0.32
    popocat-2 up 32+11:43, 0 users, load 0.16, 0.13, 0.08
    shindig up 43+10:50, 0 users, load 0.03, 0.02, 0.03
    stromboli up 46+12:35, 1 user, load 0.00, 0.00, 0.01
    fuego up 60+15:49, 7 users, load 0.00, 0.00, 0.02
    popocat up 61+21:24, 0 users, load 1.08, 0.63, 0.22
    cadeau up 87+02:18, 3 users, load 0.09, 0.13, 0.20
    sponge up 88+13:43, 0 users, load 0.17, 0.12, 0.08
    curlmakr up 101+23:35, 0 users, load 0.10, 0.10, 0.08
    twenty20 up 311+14:53, 0 users, load 0.00, 0.00, 0.01
    ceilidh up ??:??, 0 users, load 0.10, 0.16, 0.16
    ======================================================================

    Those figures following "up" are in the format:

    days+hours:minutes

    and the one at the bottom of the list happens to have been up
    sufficiently long to overflow the display format. Using a different
    program (instead of "ruptime" to show a list of machines), I see:

    1:37pm up 411 day(s), 21:34, 3 users, load average: 0.09, 0.09, 0.11

    with the plain "uptime" program -- so it has been up for well over a
    year. And it happens to be the oldest OS in the collection. The times
    for the others reflect when I needed to make hardware changes (thus
    requiring a powerdown and reboot), or when a power outage took out those
    which were not on UPS (the servers are the main ones on UPS), or, (in
    the case of ceilidh), when there was a sufficiently long power outage to
    require taking all systems on the UPS down before the UPS ran out of
    battery charge. (O.K. Izalco happens to have a flakey memory SIMM,
    which takes it down once every few months, but it reboots cleanly on its
    own, and continues to perform its job. :) It is not enough of a problem
    for me to track down which SIMM is the problem.

    Enjoy,
    DoN.
     
    DoN. Nichols, Feb 26, 2005
    #33
  14. Brian Baird

    G.T. Guest

    G.T., Feb 26, 2005
    #34
  15. Brian Baird

    Alan Browne Guest

    The marketplace is the God of commerce.

    (I remember them trying to sell their variant of the PC to us back in the mid
    80's (aided and abetted by our IT dept. who had a DEC fixation). It was a slick
    looking piece of garbage that ran a variant of VMS. Had we chosen that, we
    would have had the ammunition to clear the IT twits who pushed it, I suppose).
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 26, 2005
    #35
  16. Brian Baird

    Alan Browne Guest

    Oh, 15 years in s/w engineering before going on to more entertaining persuits...
    The first days of MS DOS had viruses. We bought into anti viruse s/w and got on
    with work. In later years, the few Mac's we had, had anti-V as well.
    Firewalls, anti-spam, etc. are just follow ons. Nothing to getr excited about.
    I run Linux too, and yep, it's firewalled. (No A-V as of yet).

    I've rarely used IE (Netscape is fine, thanks).

    The inconvenience and cost of the s/w for protection, and procedures to keep
    protected are small beer compared to the value of computing, which in the main,
    for most people is communication, not information processing.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 26, 2005
    #36
  17. Brian Baird

    Alan Browne Guest

    As long as you don't actually use the system up to its claimed full potential.
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 26, 2005
    #37
  18. Brian Baird

    Alan Browne Guest


    of course it lacks some capabilities than when booting os 9 natively.
    however, the sheer majority of apps and even things which directly
    modified os 9's behaviour work without a problem. but there will be a
    few that will have some issues.

    how many windows 3.1 apps can still run in xp without any problem
    whatsoever?[/QUOTE]

    I'm currently running code I compiled for DOS back in the early 90's. Direct to
    the h/w use of timers, interrupts, serial I/O, reads/writes files, etc. I can
    recompile with my old DOS MS and Borland compilers and assemblers, no prob.

    Even Excel which starts badly uner XP still _works_ under XP.
    I'd say there are many more PC programs that have survived through more OS
    changes than Mac.

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Feb 26, 2005
    #38
  19. Digital sold plenty of "standard" PCs running Windows as well. Indeed,
    they had some of the first 64-bit Windows systems, until Microsoft dropped
    support for the Alpha chip. With our larger and larger digital camera
    images and videos, I think 64-bit computing will come sooner than many
    people expect.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Feb 26, 2005
    #39
  20. I have had OS X die on me just once, and that was the initial release
    several years ago.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Feb 26, 2005
    #40
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