Why AMD chips better than Pentium in PC use for web designing and related chores

Discussion in 'Photoshop' started by Ko Po Hui, Oct 11, 2003.

  1. Ko Po Hui

    Ko Po Hui Guest

    Hi there,

    l would like to express my greatest appreciation to those replied to my previous posting "What type of PC configuration are DW, Photoshop and etc fit into??", thank you so much, from those replies l somehow more or less, got a clue what to get for my PC, in its coming upgrading..

    However, from almost all the feedback l'd gather, l noticed most user preferred AMD chips to Pentium, whereas large number of my pals a nd associates recommend Pentium processor.. caught in a middle.. any folks outhere could kindly enlight me??

    thanks n have a nice day ahead...

    Best Regards
     
    Ko Po Hui, Oct 11, 2003
    #1
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  2. I would suggest your choice on motherboard would be more important. Once
    that decision is made, then go with the processor it supports - either will
    be fine.
     
    William Tasso, Oct 11, 2003
    #2
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  3. Hi there,

    l would like to express my greatest appreciation to those replied to my previous posting "What type of PC configuration are DW, Photoshop and etc fit into??", thank you so much, from those replies l somehow more or less, got a clue what to get for my PC, in its coming upgrading..

    However, from almost all the feedback l'd gather, l noticed most user preferred AMD chips to Pentium, whereas large number of my pals a nd associates recommend Pentium processor.. caught in a middle.. any folks outhere could kindly enlight me??

    thanks n have a nice day ahead...

    Best Regards










    If I were recommending something to you for image editing, I would definately recommend a Pentium 4 or Xeon. Things I have found out, are that AMD's tend to beat Pentiums in gaming, but Pentiums always beat AMD in multimedia like image/video editing and so on.

    Right now, for my workstation (just for image editing/web development/casual things), im running on a dual 2.4ghz Intel Xeon. All I can say is, Its great, been everything I wanted. Plus windows detects my dual xeons really as 4 processors :) .

    So flat out for what your doing, I would say get a Pentium, Then , like william said, get a good motherboard to match it. Many underestimate the power of the motherboard, it is the thing in your computer that connects all of those little parts. For a motherboard, I would definately recommend nothing less than a Giga-Byte/Asus.

    Thanks,
    Dan
    Hosting for the New Age
    www.DynamoHosting.net
     
    Dan DeVincent, Oct 11, 2003
    #3
  4. However, from almost all the feedback l'd gather, l noticed most user
    I prefer Pentium over AMD, though I've used both and not run into any real
    problems. I don't trust the speed claims that AMD makes and the way they
    rate their chips. Does an AMD XP 2000+ run as fast or faster than a P4 2GB?
    I'm not so sure about that.

    Also AMD's use more power and run hotter.
     
    Red E. Kilowatt, Oct 11, 2003
    #4
  5. Ko Po Hui

    Ange Guest

    Hi there,

    l would like to express my greatest appreciation to those replied to my
    previous posting "What type of PC configuration are DW, Photoshop and etc
    fit into??", thank you so much, from those replies l somehow more or less,
    got a clue what to get for my PC, in its coming upgrading..

    However, from almost all the feedback l'd gather, l noticed most user
    preferred AMD chips to Pentium, whereas large number of my pals a nd
    associates recommend Pentium processor.. caught in a middle.. any folks
    outhere could kindly enlight me??<

    I agree with Red - AMD chips seem burn hotter, esp for imaging apps. I
    distinctly recall replacing a couple of motherboards with AMD chips (this
    was 4 or 5 years ago, so I don't know if they've improved). Heatsinks were
    literally fried out and the case fans worked overtime. Again, this was
    several years ago, so it may have improved, but I don't know that I'd bet my
    system on it yet when using imaging and design applications.

    YMMV.
     
    Ange, Oct 11, 2003
    #5
  6. Ko Po Hui

    Paul Furman Guest

    Unless things have changed recently the main difference is price. AMD is
    less expensive and probably not quite as stable. Perhaps that allows you
    to afford a dual versus single or a faster chip.
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 11, 2003
    #6
  7. It depends on who and what. Generally, people who aren't too familiar
    with what they are using, tend to recommend Intel because of the
    marketing.

    While AMD are pretty good all round, especially in terms of
    responsiveness and pricing. For the case of multimedia stuff, I have
    to say the Pentium 4s are probably a better choice in terms of
    performance, especially the HT enabled processor should allow you to
    get some other stuff done while waiting for those minute long filters.

    Though as mentioned, the motherboard is more important than the chip
    if you want to talk about stability & reliability. In most cases, the
    board is more likely to die on you before the CPU.

    However, if your CPU does die, Intel does have one benefit over AMD.
    At least in .SG where we both are, Intel does a direct exchange thru
    Fedex(or UPS), for AMD it takes ages.

    As for AMD running hotter, it's not really true. Part of the problem
    was due to an infamous video as well as Intel's deliberate fudging of
    their thermal figures to make their chips look cooler. If you compare
    performance equivalent processor grades, their thermal dissipation are
    largely similar.

    Current boards generally come with thermal protection so neither are
    likely to burn and die on you... unless you're the kind that enjoy
    ripping off your heatsink while playing a 3D game or using PS.

    Frankly, if I were you, I'll take my budget, splurge on 1GB of RAM, a
    pair of large 120GB or bigger HDD with a RAID 1 card, then a 19" or
    bigger screen, then whatever's left, goes to the board and processor
    :pppPp

    --
    L.Angel: I'm looking for web design work.
    If you need basic to med complexity webpages at affordable rates, email me :)
    Standard HTML, SHTML, MySQL + PHP or ASP, Javascript.
    If you really want, FrontPage & DreamWeaver too.
    But keep in mind you pay extra bandwidth for their bloated code
     
    The little lost angel, Oct 11, 2003
    #7
  8. Ko Po Hui

    Paul Davis Guest

    Doesn't really matter all that much, AMDs and Intels are good product.
    I own both CPUs (2.4ghz each) and they are comparable for what I do with
    them. The real critical factor is the motherboard. The same CPU with
    excellent components in the system with the wrong motherboard is
    throwing away money.
    Paul
     
    Paul Davis, Oct 11, 2003
    #8
  9. Ko Po Hui

    Faolan Guest

    For chip speeds. AMD are about equal or better up to about the
    2800/2.8Ghz mark then Intel are better.

    Hyperthreading, a feature that's only use on the higher 875 Mobo's and
    you pay the price. Some mobo's bypass this with their 865 mobo's, but
    it's not official. It's a nice feature that can speed up the processor
    but it really depends on the processes, and can actually slow down the
    system in some cases!.

    AMD also have a new chip called the Opteron, there are several variants
    for the markets (Desktop, Gaming/Workstation and server). It's actually
    faster than many of the equivalent speed Intels. Also the great
    advantage it's a 64Bit Processor, but Windows won't support it till next
    year. Linux already does. However as it's a new product the market is
    still developing to take advantage of it, but looks promising, but is
    rather expensive at present. Benchmarks depending on which chip it
    excels in 3d gfx work.

    When buying a new system, concentrate on the mobo. Giga-Byte give a lot
    of bang for the buck, and usually well recommended as the most stable
    mobo around.

    Summary, AMD is usually cheaper and well regarded (ignore people who say
    that they run hot, are unstable etc that's partially Intel propaganda).
    AMD is seen the gamers/over clockers choice but makes a good
    workstation.

    Intel you have to spend a lot of money to the full features of the P4
    (Hyperthreading) by getting a 875 Mobo rather than a 865. The main
    'image' of the chip is it's a 'corporate' chip aimed at the business
    market.

    Order of precedence for spending money on a system:

    Mobo
    RAM
    Processor
    Hard drive
    Gfx card
    Any other devices (sound, LAN, SCSI)

    Check out www.TomsHardware.com for info on the chips and variants.

    Personally I run both of my workstations (one with dual Athlon and the
    other single processor) with AMD. Ironically the main workstation is
    only running a 1.4 Athlon but I get by with it. I spent most of my money
    on the Mobo and the RAM (1.3Gb) as I work with largish images. Also SCSI
    helps a *lot*.
     
    Faolan, Oct 11, 2003
    #9
  10. Ko Po Hui

    Guest Guest

    good post there

    seems like you really know your stuff
    What motherboard do you recommend with HT chips ?

    I am thinking of getting a DIY but prices of DELL is really attractive
    Any idea what sort of motherboard DELL uses ?
     
    Guest, Oct 12, 2003
    #10
  11. Ko Po Hui

    Fred Guest

    AMD or Intel cpu? Excuse, but that's a ridiculous question. Doesn't
    matter at all, both are great.
    Just *don't* buy the *fastest* model of either product; they are
    hilariously overpriced.

    The motherboard matters in terms of stability. And you want a reputable
    company that will still supply you with BIOS updates in two or three
    years from now.

    You want at least 512 MB RAM, better 1 GB or more. Don't buy the
    cheapest no-name RAM.

    Because you have to save your work often (Photoshop), you want a fast
    harddisk drive (IDE), or two or three of the same in an IDE RAID array.
    It's just no fun to sit still and wait for 15 seconds while you're
    saving your work - because when you're correcting a photo you might do
    this every other minute.

    BTW: you don't need a fast graphics card for Photoshop. You don't need
    any 3d hardware support for Photoshop. This is a common misconception.
    Any cheap graphics card will do, as long as it gives a good quality
    signal and has enough RAM for your screen size (e.g. 8 MB for 1600 x
    1200 pixels @ 32 bit 'color depth' per pixel).
     
    Fred, Oct 12, 2003
    #11
  12. Ko Po Hui

    Wipkip Guest

    Fred wrote:
    Maxtor G450 is about the best for the money for Photoshop.
     
    Wipkip, Oct 12, 2003
    #12
  13. It would depend on what exactly you need. Generally I'll suggest you
    look for the reliable brand names and see which one fits your budget
    and feature set. Since you're looking to push the system like the way
    gamers do, almost any board from a reputable manufacturer (Asus,
    Gigabyte, MSI) would be good enough.

    Avoid the enthusiast brands like Abit, Epox etc. While they might give
    a tad "more" performance with lotsa of gizmos & tweaking functions, I
    haven't really heard good things ahout their reliability & stability.
    They change from time to time, last I heard, MSI's supposed to be
    doing the manufacturering. Just not sure when they are taking over the
    current manufacturer. If you're not familiar with DIY, a Dell might be
    a viable option. Though personally, I'd never buy one for myself
    :pPpppP

    --
    L.Angel: I'm looking for web design work.
    If you need basic to med complexity webpages at affordable rates, email me :)
    Standard HTML, SHTML, MySQL + PHP or ASP, Javascript.
    If you really want, FrontPage & DreamWeaver too.
    But keep in mind you pay extra bandwidth for their bloated code
     
    The little lost angel, Oct 12, 2003
    #13
  14. Ko Po Hui

    dello Guest

    One advantage of Dell is that you get a legal copy of Windows XP, which
    can be the most expensive item for a DIY.
     
    dello, Oct 13, 2003
    #14
  15. Of course, for those who have no ethical qualms about piracy, and are
    sure they won't get caught... ;)
     
    rfgdxm/Robert F. Golaszewski, Oct 13, 2003
    #15
  16. and subscribers to MSDN - oh but you already implied that ;o)
     
    William Tasso, Oct 13, 2003
    #16
  17. Imagine how much it would cost if it wasn't crap.
     
    David Venn-Brown, Oct 14, 2003
    #17
  18. Ko Po Hui

    Paul Furman Guest

    You can get an OEM OS from a lot of parts suppliers if you also get some
    parts from them. I don't know the legality but I've heard it's pretty
    common. Seems a reasonable loophole, perhaps.
     
    Paul Furman, Oct 14, 2003
    #18
  19. Yah, another good reason to avoid them... :ppPpP
    DIY'ing a new system usually means you can get a copy of OEM OS only
    to be sold with a "new system" (last i heard defined as a board + CPU
    or something) for relatively cheaper prices than a retail one. Or
    re-use an older OS.

    Of course, one could just defy The Evil Empire and go straight to a
    Linux setup.

    --
    L.Angel: I'm looking for web design work.
    If you need basic to med complexity webpages at affordable rates, email me :)
    Standard HTML, SHTML, MySQL + PHP or ASP, Javascript.
    If you really want, FrontPage & DreamWeaver too.
    But keep in mind you pay extra bandwidth for their bloated code
     
    The little lost angel, Oct 14, 2003
    #19
  20. Ko Po Hui

    dello Guest

    Who are these suppliers?

     
    dello, Oct 14, 2003
    #20
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