Why current silver DSLRs make people want to vomit

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by RichA, Aug 1, 2007.

  1. RichA

    Alan Browne Guest

    Much more expensive than plastic.
    That's not how carbon fibre complex shapes are made. They are made
    layer by layer on a form and then pressure cured. For irregular forms
    it is not at all conducive to automation. Plastics are typically
    injection molded which is a much cheaper process. Esp for camera bodies
    which can have elaborate internal moldings to support parts, provide
    via's for wires, channels for moving parts, etc ... doing such detail
    work in carbon fiber would be much more expensive than an all metal body.
    "Hybrid (metal/high-impact polycarbonate) case. - Grip half of the case
    is magnesium, lens side appears to be high-impact polycarbonate." -Nikon

    "The Evolt E-330 is constructed of high-impact polycarbonate plastic
    over a durable steel chassis. It measures 140 x 87 x 72 mm / 5.5" x 3.4"
    x 2.8" (WHD)." -Olympus

    "and the camera looks quite professional in its black high-impact
    polycarbonate body." -- review of a Fujifilm camera...

    etc.

    Compared to the NRE and setup costs, the choice of high quality
    poly-carb over lower quality is negligeable. What is a useful cost
    saving for a child's $2.00 toy is not worth the lowered quality for even
    a $200 film body.

    As there is a market for such things and it opens up photography to more
    users, why not?

    You can keep up your mindless prattle but it does not make polycarbonate
    body cameras evil in any way other than for those who expose themselves
    and their gear to truly harsh conditions.
     
    Alan Browne, Aug 5, 2007
    #41
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  2. RichA

    Spinoza Guest

    Thanks, I'll hide it behind a 600mm f4/L. :p
     
    Spinoza, Aug 5, 2007
    #42
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  3. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Aug 1, 3:08 pm, 0m (Paul Mitchum) wrote:
    : > > The Rebel and Rebel XT. Very rare Nikon D50s and Olympus E-500s.
    : > > What they all share is a stigma in cameras that in humans is akin to
    : > > leprosy. Silvered plastic. It looks so awful and cheezy that only
    : > > the lowest forms of life (bottom barrel pocketable P&Ss) wear it like
    : > > a badge of honour.
    : > > However, mark my words. If Canon or Nikon released a metal bodied
    : > > DSLR with a silver finish like the old FE or AE-1s SLRs, it would
    : > > cause a sensation. IMO, it could possibly outsell black.
    : >
    : > <http://www.dpreview.com/news/0706/07060101pentax50thdslr.asp>
    : >
    : > --http://www.xoverboard.com/cartoons/2007/070416_argument.html
    :
    : Better, but still silvered plastic. Sad, when you consider even the
    : lowliest Pentax SLR (K1000 $129.body when it left production) was
    : metal shelled.

    A film camera has more moving parts, and therefore more components under
    mechanical stress, than a digital camera has. Maybe that makes plastic
    unsuitable.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 6, 2007
    #43
  4. RichA

    RichA Guest

    And Samsung makes metal P&S cameras with no moving parts to speak of.
    Part of value, I grant you, is perception. Which is why you will
    never likely see a polycarbonate pro camera.
     
    RichA, Aug 6, 2007
    #44
  5. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : JoeT wrote:
    : >
    : > : >> The Rebel and Rebel XT. Very rare Nikon D50s and Olympus E-500s.
    : >> What they all share is a stigma in cameras that in humans is akin to
    : >> leprosy. Silvered plastic. It looks so awful and cheezy that only
    : >> the lowest forms of life (bottom barrel pocketable P&Ss) wear it like
    : >> a badge of honour.
    : >> However, mark my words. If Canon or Nikon released a metal bodied
    : >> DSLR with a silver finish like the old FE or AE-1s SLRs, it would
    : >> cause a sensation. IMO, it could possibly outsell black.
    : >>
    : >
    : > Why on earth would anyone spend more than a scant second of time
    : > concerned with such mundane issues as color choices of plastic bodied
    : > cameras?
    : > At the price point, you like silver, get it, you like black, get it.
    : > What mature individual give a rats ass what anyone superficially thinks
    : > in this regard?
    : >
    : >
    : I'm with RichA on this.
    : If you're taking photos of people, it does make a difference as they
    : won't take you seriously if you're obviously using a silver camera that
    : looks like a toy. You can dismiss this as fantasy if you like, but you
    : are wrong. If you aren't taking photos of people, then it doesn't
    : matter a rat's arse.

    What (other than Rich's goofy prattle) makes you think a silver camera looks
    like a toy? My daughter's kids have a toy digital camera, and it's either
    yellow or pink. (I forget which.) It most definitely isn't silver.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 7, 2007
    #45
  6. RichA

    frederick Guest

    If "pros" had used almost exclusively pink cameras for the past 20
    years, then black cameras would probably look like toys...
    Nah - IMO some things just should be a certain colour. Perhaps
    generation Y will want interchangeable coloured skins for the cameras -
    an opportunity to express their creativity and individuality through
    over-consumption of mass-produced techno toys.
     
    frederick, Aug 7, 2007
    #46
  7. RichA

    Charlie Self Guest

    The rationale for a matte black weapon is simple: it doesn't reflect
    light to give away a person's position, also the reason such rifles
    use flash suppressors. In my understanding, possibly misunderstanding,
    something like 40 years ago, black created fewer reflections in many
    types of photos, thus was preferred by pros.
     
    Charlie Self, Aug 7, 2007
    #47
  8. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Y-gen wants nothing to do with individuality.
    They are as conformist as Patrick Bateman in "American Psycho."
     
    RichA, Aug 7, 2007
    #48
  9. RichA

    Jim Guest

    It would also cost somewhere in the xxxx US Dollar market. Nothing wrong w
    ih modern plastics. No, I wouldn't buy one silver colored. While my
    1971 Nikon Ftn is solid metal, it has some wear spots but it is still a
    fine camera and does everything a film camera needs to be able to do.
    Look at this way, my D70s is already out of date. I don't need my
    digital cameras to be made of solid metal. The technology dates so
    fast. In another year this camera will be dumpster foder. who cares if
    only last 5 years. My Nikon F still does what it does, transports
    film, fires the shutter at an accurate speed and takes full advantage
    of the best film I can buy today. My N90s does this and then some. My
    D70s can not take advantage of the best compact flash cards, and no
    mater what I do is still a 6 megapixel. I like the camera, don't get
    me wrong. But, I am an amatuer, I will never kill a plastic... even a
    cheap plastic (which the D70s is not) camera before its technology is
    so far outdated that it becomes a door stop. Which is why I, as an
    amatuer, would never buy a Leica digital nor a Nikon (or Canon) pro
    camera. It may last forever, but after a couple of years, well, the
    guy with the 300 buck Panasonic can out perform you. Its different
    for the pro's, they use the cameras day and day out. Perhaps they do
    wear them out. If the camera lasts a couple of years and works great.
    It's a deductible expense and you buy a new one.
    Jim <[email protected]
     
    Jim, Aug 8, 2007
    #49
  10. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : >
    : > : >
    : >
    : >
    : > > JoeT wrote:
    : >
    : > >>: > >>> The Rebel and Rebel XT. Very rare Nikon D50s and Olympus E-500s.
    : > >>> What they all share is a stigma in cameras that in humans is akin to
    : > >>> leprosy. Silvered plastic. It looks so awful and cheezy that only
    : > >>> the lowest forms of life (bottom barrel pocketable P&Ss) wear it like
    : > >>> a badge of honour.
    : > >>> However, mark my words. If Canon or Nikon released a metal bodied
    : > >>> DSLR with a silver finish like the old FE or AE-1s SLRs, it would
    : > >>> cause a sensation. IMO, it could possibly outsell black.
    : >
    : > >> Why on earth would anyone spend more than a scant second of time
    : > >> concerned with such mundane issues as color choices of plastic bodied
    : > >> cameras?
    : > >> At the price point, you like silver, get it, you like black, get it. What
    : > >> mature individual give a rats ass what anyone superficially thinks in
    : > >> this regard?
    : >
    : > > I'm with RichA on this.
    : > > If you're taking photos of people, it does make a difference as they won't
    : > > take you seriously if you're obviously using a silver camera that looks
    : > > like a toy. You can dismiss this as fantasy if you like, but you are
    : > > wrong. If you aren't taking photos of people, then it doesn't matter a
    : > > rat's arse.
    : >
    : > Would a black M16 would kill better than one spray painted in silver? The
    : > enemy won't take a silver M16 seriously but the projectile would shoot akin
    : > to the black one. Perhaps then the silver M16 would have a higher kill ratio
    : > as the enemy would pause and gawk and get killed in mid laugh. But I suppose
    : > a black M16 would have a more authoritarian, swatty, control and scare the
    : > sheeple effect, and have a black matte nastiness about it.. making the
    : > enemy cringe and shots get missed. But black is kewl, even to the point of
    : > catching the eye of rent a cops and other authority figures stopping you on
    : > the street with your phallic black camera.
    :
    : The rationale for a matte black weapon is simple: it doesn't reflect
    : light to give away a person's position, also the reason such rifles
    : use flash suppressors. In my understanding, possibly misunderstanding,
    : something like 40 years ago, black created fewer reflections in many
    : types of photos, thus was preferred by pros.

    The rationale given for the first all-black 35mm camera (which, if I remember
    correctly, was an extra-cost version of the Nikon S-3) was that by reflecting
    less light, it made the photographer less conspicuous. I'm not sure that
    anybody (with the possible exception of closeup nature photographers) actually
    bought that argument, but it eventually became faddish to buy the black
    version. Fads come and go, especially in the black/silver world; you can see
    it in products as diverse as automobiles, cell phones, laptop computers, and,
    of course, cameras. The only thing of which we can be fairly certain is that
    for every major swing in one direction, there will eventually be a swing back
    in the other direction. If we wait long enough, we may see Rich dismissing
    black cameras as "toys".

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Aug 9, 2007
    #50
  11. RichA

    D.M. Procida Guest

    Metal expands and contracts more than plastic does when temperature
    changes, and it's also a better conductor of heat in the first place.
    Does this have any implications for lenses?

    Daniele
     
    D.M. Procida, Aug 10, 2007
    #51
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