Why do/did lens names end in -or or -ar?

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by Alasdair, Jun 8, 2008.

  1. Alasdair

    Alasdair Guest

    It intrigues me why the names of lenses end in -or or -ar. For
    example, Tessar, Pancolar, Soligor, Vivitar, and several more I can't
    remember.
     
    Alasdair, Jun 8, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Alasdair

    Paul Giverin Guest

    Well this isn't the complete answer but I quote from a recent edition of
    Amateur Photographer:-

    "This year Nikon celebrates the 75th anniversary of the launch of its
    first lens in March 1933, a lens for aerial photography. The brand name
    was formed by adding a "r" to an abbreviation of the firm's name "Nippon
    Kogaku". It followed the European practice of lens names ending in "r".

    So it looks like there was an element of copy-cat involved.

    --
    Paul Giverin

    British Jet Engine Website:- www.britjet.co.uk

    My photos:- www.pbase.com/vendee
     
    Paul Giverin, Jun 8, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Alasdair

    Rob Morley Guest

    No idea, but there's plenty of them - Pantar, Lanthar, Planar, Skopar,
    Protar, Artar, Biotar, Biometar, Heliar, Summar, Summitar, Elmar, Xenar,
    Xenotar, Solinar, Ektar, Omegar, Symmar, Ronar, Sironar, Serenar,
    Thambar, Takumar, Glyptar.

    I can't think of many '-or' names - Nikkor, Dagor, Rokkor, Hektor.

    Of course there's also Flektogon, Ultron, Neonon, Rodagon, Epsilon,
    Hypergon, Grandagon, Summicron, Biogon, Distagon, Angulon, Pentacon,
    Orestegon, Omicron, Variogon, Claron, Meogon, Componon, Imagon,
    Rokinon, Nokton, Holgon, Xenon, Pokemon ...



















































































    Just testing. :)
     
    Rob Morley, Jun 8, 2008
    #3
  4. Alasdair

    Mike Coon Guest

    The suffix -gon must be short for gonad, suggesting that the product is the
    dog's bollocks...

    Mike.
     
    Mike Coon, Jun 8, 2008
    #4
  5. Alasdair

    Rob Morley Guest

    It does seem to denote fine quality.
     
    Rob Morley, Jun 9, 2008
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.