Why plastic is trash for cameras

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Rich, Aug 24, 2005.

  1. Rich

    eawckyegcy Guest

    RichA can't defend his own arguments:
    Then why did the "metal" and "plastic" cameras fail at the same time?
     
    eawckyegcy, Aug 31, 2005
    #41
    1. Advertisements

  2. Rich

    Brian Baird Guest

    Blah blah blah...
     
    Brian Baird, Aug 31, 2005
    #42
    1. Advertisements

  3. Rich

    Brian Baird Guest

    I think the answer will always elude Rich. But it might be funny to see
    his response.
     
    Brian Baird, Aug 31, 2005
    #43
  4. Rich

    RichA Guest

    Are you talking about the mirror box vice test? Because the plastic
    walls on the mirror box were about TWICE as thick as the aluminum
    ones. You can easily deform a sheet steel piece of hot air conduit,
    but try doing that with a box beam with 1/4" thick walls.
    -Rich


    "Bittorrents are REFUNDS for all the BAD movie products Hollywood
    never gave us refunds for in the past"
     
    RichA, Aug 31, 2005
    #44
  5. Rich

    RichA Guest

    No, the correct method is to put on your monkey mask, cover your ears,
    eyes and mouth (well, Canon nuts don't cover their mouths) and go,
    waa, waa, waaaaaa!
    -Rich


    "Bittorrents are REFUNDS for all the BAD movie products Hollywood
    never gave us refunds for in the past"
     
    RichA, Aug 31, 2005
    #45
  6. Rich

    Mike Guest

    Yep - I'll be lining up fo rthat camera built out of box beams. Could use it to drive 100 mm nails whgen there is
    nothing worth photographing. Guess it might concern airport security though...

    Mike (in anticipation)
     
    Mike, Aug 31, 2005
    #46
  7. Rich

    Brian Baird Guest

    You still haven't really answered the question.
     
    Brian Baird, Aug 31, 2005
    #47
  8. Rich

    eawckyegcy Guest

    RichA is making less sense:
    Ok, you say that 'Aluminum alloys' 'typically' have 5x the strength of
    plastic.

    You now explain the observation of equal strength by claiming the
    "plastic walls on the mirror box" were 'about' "TWICE" as thick.

    In this reality, 2 does not equal 5. Your explanation of this
    discrepancy is what?

    However, this is all a stupid distraction from the central point:
    since the plastic and metal cameras have been shown to be just as
    strong, it makes no difference (at least from a strength standpoint)
    what they are made of. Can't you even do the job of a FUDster
    properly?
     
    eawckyegcy, Aug 31, 2005
    #48
  9. Rich

    Slack Guest


    In other words, in RichA's head.
     
    Slack, Aug 31, 2005
    #49
  10. Rich

    Brian Baird Guest

    Mother nature abhors a vacuum.
     
    Brian Baird, Aug 31, 2005
    #50
  11. Rich

    RichA Guest

    They probably had similar strength as configured, but the test
    was an amateur effort anyway so it proves very little.
    But like I said, if you want plastic to perform like steel or
    aluminum, it has to be considerably thicker and I'm not convinced
    that plastic cameras don't have weak points that metal bodied cameras
    do not. You could make a camera out of cardboard and if it's thick
    enough (comparatively) it will resist crushing just like steel, but
    who'd want to?
    -Rich


    "Bittorrents are REFUNDS for all the BAD movie products Hollywood
    never gave us refunds for in the past"
     
    RichA, Sep 1, 2005
    #51
  12. Rich

    Brian Baird Guest

    It proves more than your amateur efforts.
    Again, show me where thickness = bad?
     
    Brian Baird, Sep 1, 2005
    #52
  13. Rich

    RichA Guest

    Bad is subjective in this case. For me, spending
    over $500 on a camera made of plastic is bad.
    For you it's not. But if you really believe that
    plastic is acceptable for a camera body, how would
    you like a plastic 1DS MkII for $5000?
    My guess is that very few people would go for it.
    -Rich


    "Bittorrents are REFUNDS for all the BAD movie products Hollywood
    never gave us refunds for in the past"
     
    RichA, Sep 2, 2005
    #53
  14. Rich

    eawckyegcy Guest

    You started this idiot thread with:

    Just another example. This fellow dropped a lens.
    It broke at the plastic point, even though the lens was
    a plastic-metal combo. Polycarbonate versus aluminum, stainless
    or magnesium? No contest.

    So was the above camera broken by subjectivity or something else?
    First, you say that plastic is weak and unreliable. Now it's all just
    a matter of taste.
    Why not just admit you made a mistake and move on? All of this
    bullshit just makes you look even _more_ stupid than you may actually
    be.
     
    eawckyegcy, Sep 2, 2005
    #54
  15. Rich

    RichA Guest

    Why not answer the question, dunce?
    -Rich


    "Bittorrents are REFUNDS for all the BAD movie products Hollywood
    never gave us refunds for in the past"
     
    RichA, Sep 3, 2005
    #55
  16. Rich

    Brian Baird Guest

    Still waiting for you to answer yours.
     
    Brian Baird, Sep 3, 2005
    #56
  17. Rich

    Rich Guest

    That's what I thought. None of you would pay
    $1000+ for a plastic bodied DSLR, even though
    plastic is "as good" as metal. Chortle!
    -Rich
     
    Rich, Sep 3, 2005
    #57
  18. Rich

    Charlie Self Guest

    Actually, the body on the Pentax *istD is plastic, but it's over a
    stainless steel frame.

    But what you're describing, rather than being a brilliant coup on your
    part, is a feat of marketing ability, not particular need. Plastic
    combines with some metals in many situations to provide a more durable,
    and lighter, camera than is possible with either material alone. In
    other arenas, say hand power tools, the plastic makes up all of the
    bodies of even the most expensive tools, and, to make matters worse
    (from your point of view), this is blow-molded plastic.

    Primary reasons are two: weight and safety. Durability is about the
    same as with the machined cast aluminum cases of the '50s and '60s,
    unless the tool is dropped, at which point one of the superior features
    of plastic comes in. The plastic tool survives. Cast aluminum cracks.

    Oh, yeah. There's another reason. Cost. Today's power tools are cheaper
    than ever before (this will change as feed stocks for plastics go out
    of sight, along with the cost of transporting the tools). They are also
    more durable and offer a ton of features not available in the '50s and
    '60s. Somewhat like cameras.

    You're trying to create a straw man with your all-plastic-bodied
    camera, but mostly what you're doing is bullshitting.
     
    Charlie Self, Sep 3, 2005
    #58
  19. Rich

    Slack Guest


    This has already begun due to the cost of petroleum. Many of my plastic
    suppliers have already start the cost escalation.
     
    Slack, Sep 3, 2005
    #59
  20. Rich

    Charlie Self Guest

    Yes. This is one area all the pundits seem to ignore. We're in a
    plastic society, with plastic used for almost everything from razors to
    pens to lighters to grocery bags. When we hear about price increases,
    it's always at the gas pump, but that is not where the worst of this
    will eventually hit, because many of us can adjust our driving at
    least a little. It's going to be difficult to even talk a supermarket
    into going back to paper bags, or convince pen manufacturers that those
    lovely resin barrels they have been used for 75 years or so can easily
    be replaced by metal or wood--they can, of course, but the changeover
    is costly.

    Cars are about half plastic these days, and the average home has about
    35% plastic in its make-up, from paint bases, to vinyl siding to
    insulation to electrical insulation to house wrap to window cladding
    and on. Shingles have risen and are about to rise again--this hurts, as
    I need a new roof, and it is a matter of need, not choice.

    Of course, not all plastic is from petroleum feed stock, with some from
    wood cellulose and some other types from coal, but if I had to guess,
    I'd say maybe 80% of today's plastic is petroleum based.

    Things are about to change. Drastically.
     
    Charlie Self, Sep 3, 2005
    #60
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.