Will 35mm digital survive?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Anne, Jul 9, 2010.

  1. Anne

    Anne Guest

    5 years after Canon introduced the first 35mm digital camera priced for
    the amateur market, the format continues to languish.
    Despite Nikon (D700) and Sony (alpha 850 and 900) having released lower
    cost "serious amateur" 35mm format digital cameras, sales volume of all
    35mm format dslr cameras remains only about 3% of total interchangeable
    lens digital cameras sold.
    For every one Canon EOS 5D mark II (Canon's cheapest 35mm format camera)
    sold, Canon sells two EOS 7d (Canon's most expensive 1.6 crop APS-c
    camera). For every 35mm Canon camera sold, Canon sells 15 APS-c
    cameras. Even 4/3 and u4/3 format outsell total 35mm format by about 4:1.
     
    Anne, Jul 9, 2010
    #1
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  2. For me, the crop-frame format produces adequate images, with lower cost,
    lighter weight, and more compact equipment than full-frame. Had 4/3 been
    better and had a greater range of affordable lenses at the time I got my
    first DSLR I might have gone that way. But just as some larger format
    than 35mm cameras survive, full-frame will survive as well, but perhaps
    just for professionals and the top few percent of the amateur market.

    I could be wrong, of course!

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 9, 2010
    #2
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  3. []
    Perhaps those who buy professional cameras expect that, or see it as a
    sign of ruggedisation?
    Look what can be done with consumer DX-format lenses:

    Nikon 16-85mm:
    17 elements in 11 groups (with two ED glass elements, three aspheric
    lenses)

    Nikon 18-200mm:
    16 elements/12 groups (2 ED glass elements, 3 aspheric elements)

    And for P&S cameras:

    Panasonic FZ35/38:
    11 elements in 8 groups (3 Aspheric Lenses / 2 ED lenses)

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Jul 9, 2010
    #3
  4. Anne

    MC Guest

    There is only so many pixels you can fit onto a sensor. So the larger
    the sensor the better (in theory) the quality of the image because they
    do not neet to be crammed in so tightly (hence noise levels). 15
    megapixels on a full frame (35mm) should comand better image quality
    than if those pixels were crammed onto a smaller sensor. As for camera
    size, there is only so small you can go without having to introduce a
    new range of lenses. This is something most people who have a good
    selection of glass will be a bit reluctant to do.

    MC
     
    MC, Jul 9, 2010
    #4
  5. Anne

    John A. Guest

    Which is no doubt the reason we're starting to see downward pressure
    on MF prices.
     
    John A., Jul 9, 2010
    #5
  6. Anne

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : : >5 years after Canon introduced the first 35mm digital camera priced for the
    : >amateur market, the format continues to languish.
    : > Despite Nikon (D700) and Sony (alpha 850 and 900) having released lower
    : > cost "serious amateur" 35mm format digital cameras, sales volume of all
    : > 35mm format dslr cameras remains only about 3% of total interchangeable
    : > lens digital cameras sold.
    : > For every one Canon EOS 5D mark II (Canon's cheapest 35mm format camera)
    : > sold, Canon sells two EOS 7d (Canon's most expensive 1.6 crop APS-c
    : > camera). For every 35mm Canon camera sold, Canon sells 15 APS-c cameras.
    : > Even 4/3 and u4/3 format outsell total 35mm format by about 4:1.
    :
    : Yep. I think full frame is sure to survive, but will never be the popular
    : format that APS-C continues to be. It is more or less like comparing medium
    : format in film cameras with 35mm. Once 35mm became for all practical
    : purposes the standard, medium format was relegated to professionals and very
    : serious amateurs who needed (or believed they needed) the greater film area
    : and were willing to put up with the much greater equipment costs and other
    : nuisances.

    What *do* professionals need? Do newspaper photographers, for example, insist
    on FF? At the resolution of a newspaper photo, it's hard to see what
    difference it would make.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jul 10, 2010
    #6
  7. A few years ago - not a short time in the history of digital
    photography- a few good folk, bolstered by a few trolls and a couple of
    cretins kept stating that. Most of the rest of us proved that they were
    wrong.
    Yes.
     
    John McWilliams, Jul 10, 2010
    #7
  8. Anne

    Mr.T Guest

    Check www.apug.org with 42450 members and see in how
    many ways you're wrong. I already know I'm going to regret
    this troll feeding, but I can't stand this idiot anymore...
     
    Mr.T, Jul 10, 2010
    #8
  9. Many years after the top 500 supercomputers list was
    established, computers therein continue to languish.
    The sales volume of them is absymal, out of billions and
    billions of computers sold each year, only a handful go to
    the top 500.
    Even smartphones, PDAs, washing machines (with their tiny computers
    inside), etc. etc. etc. outsell the supercomputers by
    billions to one.

    As you can see, there's no future for supercomputers at all.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Jul 10, 2010
    #9
  10. Anne

    Peter Guest


    Most need a means of increasing their revenue.
     
    Peter, Jul 10, 2010
    #10
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