will frequent use of mirror lockup shorten lifespan of mirror mechanism?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by ns, Aug 15, 2004.

  1. ns

    ns Guest

    Hi, I plan to use 2 seconds mirror lockup for every shot (canon
    digital rebel), besides getting the benefit of mirror lockup, also as
    a 2 sec timer so I don't have to buy a remote control.

    my question is, with every shot mirror locked up for 2 seconds, will
    that put too much stress on the mirror mechanism (spring etc) so the
    lifespan of the related parts be greatly shortened?

    thanks a lot.
     
    ns, Aug 15, 2004
    #1
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  2. ns

    Mxsmanic Guest

    I don't believe mirror lock-up has any effect on wear and tear, as the
    movements of the mirror and other parts are pretty much the same either
    way.
     
    Mxsmanic, Aug 15, 2004
    #2
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  3. ns

    Alan Browne Guest

    Not likely. It may shorten your battery life in some cameras.

    Depending on model, the benefits of MLU are between about 1/15
    and 1/125 ... so shooting faster or slower than that range will
    get little to no benefit from the MLU.

    2 seconds is a bit short as a delay timer. 10 seconds is typical
    (if a bit too long in most cases).

    Cheers,
    Alan
     
    Alan Browne, Aug 15, 2004
    #3
  4. ns

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    First off - I'm not sure the Rebel is capable of mirror lock. Secondly, a
    two second delay means you are going to miss an awful lot of shots and
    mis-frame a lot of others. Mirror lock is only useful for landscapes and
    still lifes.
    As to the mirror mechanism - I don't see how it could harm that, but
    really don't know, and doubt anyone who doesn't repair cameras would be any
    better informed.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Aug 15, 2004
    #4
  5. Two seconds works fine for the Road Runner.....He can get a shot of himself
    standing next to the Coyote with over a second to spare.........
     
    William Graham, Aug 15, 2004
    #5
  6. ns

    C J D Guest

    ns wrote: Hi, I plan to use 2 seconds mirror lockup for every shot (canon
    digital rebel), besides getting the benefit of mirror lockup, also as
    a 2 sec timer so I don't have to buy a remote control.

    my question is, with every shot mirror locked up for 2 seconds, will
    that put too much stress on the mirror mechanism (spring etc) so the
    lifespan of the related parts be greatly shortened?

    thanks a lot.


    As the owner of a 300D Kiss (rebel), I cannot find any reference to mirror lock-up capability either in the book or on the camera, so I don't think you can do it.  However, I think your idea is unwarranted, as the mirror vibration is very minor with this camera.  The mirror is rather smaller than a regular 35mm camera, and vibration is practically undetectable when shooting hand-held.  Camera shake will be more of a problem at low shutter speeds than mirror vibration.  On a tripod, I did a shoot in a theatre of a choir of about 60 people under theatre lighting, no flash, at 1/10 second exposure.  The blow-up showed women's jewellery, necklaces, etc, pin sharp with no sign of any shake.

    Colin D.
     
     
    C J D, Aug 16, 2004
    #6
  7. ns

    ns Guest

    thanks all that have replied, yes digital rebel doesn't have MLU built
    in (officially), but with russian hacked firmware it can MLU and works
    really well. that's part of the reason that I am a bit worried maybe
    the hardware is not designed to withstand that kind of MLU use. I
    agree tear and wear probably the same, but with the spring constantly
    being stretched 2 seconds at a time, I just hope it won't get soft or
    break or something... and there are lots of rebels failed, strangely
    all failed at the mirror mechanism (although most likely not MLU
    related since the hack has been out just for a couple of months, but
    mostly due to too many shots, I saw from 19K shots to 64K shots).

    yes I mostly shot scenary and still objects, if action I will turn MLU
    off.

    is there any resource I can find about the mirror mechanism/parts?
     
    ns, Aug 16, 2004
    #7
  8. ns

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    Remember that you only gain from using MLU in exposures that are in the
    1/10th to 1/25th second range with normal lenses (say 28-105 range) The
    longer the lens the more you need the MLU. I would leave it off most of the
    time. As to using hackware -- I would rather buy a more expensive body once
    than two cheaper ones. You know the guarantee will go right out the window
    the second you alter the camera.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Aug 16, 2004
    #8

  9. I'll add a small correction ot Tony's post here, to change "longer
    focal lengths" to "higher magnifications". Which then makes it apply both
    to long focal lengths *and* macro work, which is where I use MLU most of
    the time.

    MLU can be of greater use in odder positions, such as vertical
    compositions or where the camera is angled significantly, because these put
    a much greater load on the tripod and thus can be more susceptible to
    influence from shaking. The same goes for using the tripod mount of a long
    lens, rather than the camera mount, because then the camera is hanging off
    in space to one side of the pivot point, and simple leverage comes into
    play.

    There is always the laser pointer trick to see exactly what effect
    mirror-shake and MLU *does* have on your camera. Strap a laser pointer to
    the lens aiming down a moderate length hallway, at least 12' but the longer
    the better. Or aim it at a mirror that bounces it to the wall behind the
    camera (which may allow closer inspection). Then trip the shutter with MLU
    on and off, and with several combinations of lens and positions, to see
    what effect it really has. The jiggling red dot will display it nicely.


    - Al.
     
    Al Denelsbeck, Aug 16, 2004
    #9
  10. ns

    Tony Spadaro Guest

    True - I didn't mention macro. Thanks Al.
     
    Tony Spadaro, Aug 16, 2004
    #10
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