Will the Nikon D80 or D200 do this?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by E. E. Herbert, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. For candid portraits, I'd like to use the Aperture Mode, set the
    camera to max aperture for small depth of field, set the
    minimum shutter speed to 1/60th or faster, and have the
    camera automatically choose the ISO to meet the selected
    settings I've made. Will either the D80 or D200 do that?
    (I won't be using a VR lens and probably with a lens
    of FL less than 80mm). TIA
     
    E. E. Herbert, Sep 26, 2006
    #1
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  2. E. E. Herbert

    Cynicor Guest

    The D200 definitely has an Auto ISO function. Here's a bit of
    discussion: http://photography.about.com/od/digitalcameras/a/autoiso.htm
     
    Cynicor, Sep 26, 2006
    #2
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  3. E. E. Herbert

    Ed Ruf Guest

    Yes, either will.
    -
    Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 ()
    http://EdwardGRuf.com
     
    Ed Ruf, Sep 26, 2006
    #3
  4. Yes, but more importantly, why would you want max apeture for candid
    portraits? :)
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Sep 26, 2006
    #4
  5. E. E. Herbert

    JG Guest

    quote...

    "set the camera to max aperture for small depth of field"
     
    JG, Sep 26, 2006
    #5
  6. Yes, and I asked, "Yes, but more importantly, why would you want max apeture
    for candid portraits :)".
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Sep 26, 2006
    #6
  7. uh... to minimize depth of field? wouldn't that be a pretty obvious answer?
     
    Graham Fountain, Sep 26, 2006
    #7
  8. E. E. Herbert

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Do you think he means something like F/22 is a large aperture, or
    something like F/2.8 is a large aperture?

    I'm confused by your use of the smiley.
     
    Ben Thomas, Sep 26, 2006
    #8
  9. Thanks, all. I did mean max aperture to mean maximum lens opening
    for small depth of field. I had a chance today to handle both the
    D80 and D200, and it appears that I can select ISO on either one
    rather quickly. If the viewfinder displays shutter speed, I can
    dial the ISO to get the desired shutter speed. However, if I can
    select shutter speed while in Aperture mode, I'm guessing that
    "Auto ISO" will select the ISO to meet the inputs.
    Can I select shutter speed while in Aperture Mode?
    TIA
     
    E. E. Herbert, Sep 27, 2006
    #9
  10. Didn't you look?
    No Aperture priority means you choose the aperture and the camera program,
    modified with exposure compensation, chooses the shutter speed. If you want
    to set both, that's what Manual is for.
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), Sep 27, 2006
    #10
  11. No but you can set aperture and shutterspeed in M mode. And Auto ISO
    still works!

    Peter
     
    Peter Rongsted, Sep 27, 2006
    #11
  12. Does the Manual mode mean I have to focus?
     
    E. E. Herbert, Sep 27, 2006
    #12
  13. E. E. Herbert

    Ben Thomas Guest

    There's a separate switch on the lens for manual focus.
     
    Ben Thomas, Sep 27, 2006
    #13
  14. My apologies ... I fell into the trap of thinking max f/stop.
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Sep 27, 2006
    #14
  15. Indeed ... I did. I know better, but I must have been very tired yesterday.
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Sep 27, 2006
    #15
  16. E. E. Herbert

    ASAAR Guest

    With a lens that ranges from f/2.8 to f/22, some would say that
    the max aperture is f/2.8 and the max f/stop is f/22. When I'm in
    a bad mood I'll use f/8, a really mean f/stop.
     
    ASAAR, Nov 30, 2006
    #16
  17. E. E. Herbert

    ASAAR Guest

    Having started photography way before digital, l used lenses that
    had rings on them with click-stop detents for setting the aperture.
    While all lenses didn't start or end with the same apertures, the
    intermediate ones were all the same, for instance 2.0, 2.8, 4.0,
    5.6, 8.0, 11.0, 16.0, etc. Then, with the push of a button (the DOF
    preview button) you could see the aperture close down if you looked
    into the lens, and it would be obvious that at f/2.0 the lens was
    wide open, and at f/16 you could see the aperture close way down.
    If you looked through the viewfinder, you'd see the image get
    progressively darker as you tried previewing progressively smaller
    apertures (larger f/stops). Of course even if I didn't notice this,
    or had used a camera lacking a DOF preview button I'd have known all
    about this since back then I had been reading books on photography
    and magazines for quite some time. Some of this book larnin' might
    even be possible if you spend some time with your camera's manual,
    but they're rarely as informative or clear as even the worst book.
     
    ASAAR, Nov 30, 2006
    #17
  18. E. E. Herbert

    ASAAR Guest

    A clue: The values used for most f/stops can be determined by
    multiplying or dividing their nearest neighbor f/stop by the square
    root of 2 (1.414...) So starting from an aperture of f/8 we get
    8/1.414 and 8*1.414 which is f/5.657 and f/11.312, or the familiar
    f/5.6 and f/11. Also notice that alternate f/stops differ by a
    factor of 2, such as 1.4, 2.8, 5.6, 11, 22 and 2, 4, 8, 16, 32,
    which only takes a bit of simple math to follow. :)
     
    ASAAR, Nov 30, 2006
    #18
  19. Apeture gets bigger as fstop gets smaller ...
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Nov 30, 2006
    #19
  20. Didn't you buy a D200? Why?
     
    Thomas T. Veldhouse, Nov 30, 2006
    #20
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